ARTICLE: On Artists and Alcohol

the-absinthe-drinker-portrait-of-angel-fernandez-de-soto-1

Pablo Picasso “The Absinthe Drinker”

Raise a glass to this informative article.

Click on the Link: Drinking Scenes: The Relationship Between Artists and Alcohol, by Matthew Sperling

A key quote from the article, which amuses me on many levels:

“Toulouse-Lautrec’s pictures were described by Gustave Moreau as ‘painted entirely in absinthe’; he would stop at every bar in Montmartre in order to étouffer un perroquet (choke a parrot), in the slang of the period; and he had a specially made hollow walking-stick which held an emergency half-litre stash of absinthe and a tiny shot glass.”

At the Cafe La Mie

Choke a Parrot

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec  “At the Cafe La Mie”

For me, drinking and art making don’t mix too well. These days, I might have a beer while painting at night, but it’s a rarity.

Party Painting

Multitasking: Painting at the Bar

I have been to some of the art parties that are currently popular, where wine and paint both flow. Wikipedia calls them “The Paint and Sip Industry:” group painting lessons where adult beverages are served. I’ve had wonderful experiences at events like this. It seems to be a great way to get newcomers to art lose their tentativeness and really enjoy the process, without worrying too much about the results. These inclusive, sociable painting parties really fit the Remodernist dynamic that art is for everyone.

It’s a lot of fun, but a very different vibe than the slip into the state of intuition I work up into in the studio.

Something I have learned is moderation in drinking is wonderful; however, moderation in art is a travesty.

“The artist should be intoxicated with the idea of the thing he wants to express.”

-Robert Henri

1899c Sidewalk Café oil on canvas 81.6 x 65.7 cm

Robert Henri “Sidewalk Cafe”

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