SPOON-FED “ART” AS A SOCIAL JUSTICE SHAKEDOWN

 

Dishing it up on Pharmaceutical Companies : Domenic Esposito’s Spoons

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The Postmodern coup against Western Civilization has been very effective in manipulating mass communications into a tool for social engineering. The elitists’ messaging efforts have become much more blatant and blunt in recent years, to the point they now openly proclaim their socialist and authoritarian intentions. They always had that lust for unaccountable power, but they used to lie about it.

Are these revelations occurring because the establishment feels our society has passed the tipping point already?  Or are they being forced to expose their true natures prematurely under the assault of populist challenges? The big lie narratives are breaking down, as reality refuses to follow the scripted patterns. The dismantling of centralized power will be the story of the 21st Century.

Redefining art as just another form of leftist political activism is one of the establishment’s most tedious assaults on the culture. A man named Domenic Esposito is taking a very serious issue and says he wants to draw attention to it by the means of art, but there is something off about the pitch.

The Opioid Crisis is a plague, under-reported by the media. Esposito’s own brother is affected by addiction, adding a heartfelt urgency to the situation. Esposito’s visual to address the crisis is a giant sculpture of a spoon used to cook up illicit drugs.

Bent Out of Shape 

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So surely this visual aid would be activated regarding border security. After all, most opioid drug deaths are coming from Fentanyl from China and heroin from Mexico, Huge quantities of both are being smuggled through our southern border, an estimated $10 billion dollars worth annually. Cracking down on the free flow of drugs into the country would be hugely impactful.

But Esposito doesn’t want to draw attention to that. Instead, he wants to cause trouble for some deep pocketed pharmaceutical companies with convenient offices right here in the United States.

In the Gateway Pundit article, Artist Movement Hopes to Spark Bigger Conversation About the Opioid Crisis — Using Giant 700 Pound Spoons,  a rationale is provided for why Esposito is not focused on the criminal narcotics trade that’s truly fueling the epidemic:

In 2007, months after pleading guilty to criminal charges that the Sackler family company, Purdue Pharma, had mismarketed OxyContin, the Sackler’s founded another company called Rhodes Pharma. Rhodes produces generic opioids such as oxycodone, morphine, and hydrocodone. According to a report from the Financial Times, between the Rhodes and Purdue, the Sackler family is responsible for approximately 6% of all opioid prescriptions nationwide.

According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, 80% of heroin addicts first started by using opioids.

Last year, the Opioid Spoon Project left one of their sculptures in front of the offices of Purdue. Earlier this month, they left one outside Rhodes.

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So, this company, which admitted wrongdoing 12 years ago, and is responsible of 6% of presumably LEGAL prescriptions of pain pills nationally, gets smeared with the spoon and the media hype.

80% of heroin users used opioids first? I wonder what percentage drank alcohol first as well. Esposito is missing a trick. He should set up a spoon in front of an Anheuser-Busch brewery while he’s at it. There’s no denying big Pharma has engaged in some exploitative practices. The bigger issue is a well-organized criminal syndicate is moving drugs at will across half the globe as the politicians stand idly by.

What is really going on here becomes more transparent in a the-lady-doth-protest-too-much-methinks fashion later in the article. There is no specific solution Esposito is calling for, but he does plan on making a going concern out of it:

In reality, there are so many issues at play in the opioid crisis, Esposito explained, that it is hard to pinpoint one single piece of legislation or program that would help to stop it. It needs to be tackled from multiple angles.

“For us, we are trying to hold these corporations accountable and pushing for the guidelines for getting opioids are given another look,” he said.

Esposito told the Gateway Pundit that there are more spoon drops planned for the future — and that they have a huge list of companies and people responsible that need to be shamed beyond the Sackler family.

The Opioid Spoon Project is in the process of applying for 501C3 status, to become a nonprofit. When that happens, that will allow them to begin accepting sponsorships. [emphasis mine] He said there has been a huge amount of interest from people who want to donate either time or money, but they want to make sure they do things right.

“There’s just so much fraud out there with people raising money,” Esposito laughed. “I don’t want to be seen like that. I want to make sure this is done right. We’ve done such a great job so far that I want to continue to uphold our moral and ethical standards.”

Esposito said that they are thinking about creating art to raise money that way, to help fund continuing the spoon installations.

Seriously, how much does it cost to dump a hunk of steel onto a sidewalk?

Shame, that great Postmodern blunt instrument for enforcing  obedience to the narrative. I wonder if giving a corporate sponsorship to that non-profit would be great way for a drug company to avoid the negative publicity of a renegade art installation and ceremonial activist “arrest” on their property. Let’s call it a win/win. I doubt the Cartels will be doing any charitable donations for a tax write off.

Postmodern art is tool of oppression. Here an obvious stunt is seeking to profit from harassing soft targets while claiming the moral high ground, co-opting a terrible situation without acknowledging the actual scope and reality of the problem. I wouldn’t even call this spoon thing art at all. It fails to do what real art does. It’s a one-liner, without any insights, depths, or mystery.

The left taints everything with its politics. As I describe in my book, Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization, our culture is through with the distortions of Postmodernism. We are entering a new phase, the Remodern era:

The appreciation of inclusive, inspirational art is a great bonding experience. A new national pride in our arts will be vital for the healing process.

There are important distinctions between art and propaganda. Although both are forms of visual communication, their aims are completely different. Great art explores the mysteries of human experience. Propaganda seeks to influence an intellectual decision by stirring up obscuring clouds of emotionalism.

Strong art reaches universal, shared experience by honestly presenting the results of self-exploration. Propaganda seeks to substitute that universal appeal with the presentation of ideology it assumes to be commonly held by all right-thinking people. But what if the audience doesn’t share the same convictions, or are indifferent to them? Then the art fails to connect, falls flat.  The more blatantly political a work is, the smaller its audience will be.

Remodern art is political by not being political. Instead of submitting to the Postmodern demand to make everything into an activist statement, Remodernism makes the stand good art exists independently of political poses, and ideological purity cannot stand in for effectiveness.

 

Battle Cry 

 

UPDATE: Welcome Instapundit readers! Please visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts from a Remodern perspective. 

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