DAILY ART FIX: New Play Will Bring Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks to Theatrical Life

Art world links which caught my eye…

Nighthawks by Edward Hopper 1942.jpg

Edward Hopper “Nighthawks” oil on canvas 33″ x 60″

At the time of its creation in 1942, realist works like Edward Hopper’s iconic Nighthawks painting were not trendy in the art world. As leading critic Clement Greenberg sneered in 1946: “[Hopper] is not a painter in the full sense; his means are second-hand, shabby, and impersonal.”

And yet Hopper’s work have stood the test of time much better than the abstract artists Greenberg and others championed at the time. Now the painting Nighthawks has inspired a new play. Nighthawks: A Theatrical Meditation on Solitude and Loneliness, is premiering in Chicago, the city where the painting is on display.

A little boy was trying energetically to climb atop one of the two lions that have long “guarded” the Art Institute as people poured through the doors on Saturday, becoming the latest of the millions of people who have gotten pleasure from the art inside.

Some of those creations have provided inspiration for artists in other realms — writers, musicians, playwrights — and the latest of these is June Sawyers, who has created a show titled “Nighthawks: A Theatrical Meditation on Solitude and Loneliness.”

“I call it a hybrid theater piece,” she says. “It is meant to establish a mood of loneliness and solitude. That for me is the essence of the painting.”

She does not remember the first time she saw Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks,” currently located in the Arts of the Americas-Gallery 262. But, she says, “It has always haunted me. It is my favorite American painting.”

Read the full article here: MSN – New play will bring Edward Hopper’s ‘Nighthawks,’ one of Art Institute’s most popular paintings, to theatrical life

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RICHARD BLEDSOE is a visual story teller; a painter of fables and parables. He received his BFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University. Richard has been an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, in both the United States and internationally. He lives and paints happily in Phoenix, Arizona, with his wife Michele and cat Motorhead. He is the author of Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is not a style of art, it is a form of motivation. We express the universal language of inspired humanity.

We do not imitate what came before. We find in ourselves the same divine essence of love and excitement which has inspired masterpieces throughout history. We are strengthened by drawing on traditions thousands of years old.

We integrate the bold, visionary efforts of the Modern era into a holistic, meaningful expression of contemporary life. Remodernism seeks a humble maturity which heals the fragmentation and contradictions of Modernism, and obliterates the narcissistic lies of Postmodernism.

Remodernism is the return of art as a revelation.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

ARTISTS: Ed Paschke

 He Paschke

Ed Paschke “He” oil on linen, 50″ x 78″

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“Paintings is all about problem solving. The bigger the problems you create yourself, the more resourceful you have to become to resolve it and make it work some how. If when you’re working on a painting and everything feels comfortable and cozy and secure and safe than you’re probably not doing anything new. You are probably repeating all sorts of old ideas. That frustrated, awkward feeling of not knowing how to solve the problematic area of your work will eventually force you to try something new and this sort of visual orchestration helps to pull you forward as an artist.”

-Ed Paschke (June 22, 1939 – November 25, 2004)

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Ble Boy Paschke

Ed Paschke “Blue Boy” oil on linen 24″ x 36″

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Strangulita Paschke

Ed Paschke “Strangulita” oil on linen 46″ x 80″

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Paschke Bill

Ed Paschke “Bill” oil on canvas 70″ x 48″