DAILY ART FIX: New Painting “Ladies Who Lunch”

Completed in November 2021

Richard Bledsoe “Ladies Who Lunch” acrylic on canvas 24″ x 36″

I work from visions I receive. Since my earliest artistic fascinations were linked to dinosaurs, they often appear in my paintings as powerful symbols.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: New Painting “Courtship”

Art world links which caught my eye…

Richard Bledsoe “Courtship” acrylic on canvas 30″ x 30″

I work from visions I receive. Since my earliest artistic fascinations were linked to dinosaurs, they often appear in my paintings as powerful symbols.

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RICHARD BLEDSOE is a visual story teller; a painter of fables and parables. He received his BFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University. Richard has been an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, in both the United States and internationally. He lives and paints happily in Phoenix, Arizona, with his wife Michele and cat Motorhead. He is the author of Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: New Painting “Rex”

Art world links which caught my eye…

Richard Bledsoe “Rex” acrylic on canvas 24″ x 30″

I work from visions I receive. Since my earliest artistic fascinations were linked to dinosaurs, they often appear in my paintings as powerful symbols.

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

EXPLOITS: A Very Rare Painting Reboot

 

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Richard Bledsoe “The Ghost of Slumber Mountain” oil on canvas 30″ x 24″

The second version

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I have so many ideas for paintings, it is very rare that I would ever paint the same image more than once. In fact, there is only one occasion I can remember doing it. I was reminded of the circumstances recently while we were working on some home renovations, and I had to move 16 years worth of art.

I”ve written before of a troubled time in my artistic explorations, when for several years I made bad, unresolved paintings on wood panels. While most of these unsatisfactory works are exiled to my garage, while doing our rearrangements I found one stored in the house. It happens to be the only painting I ever explicitly repainted.

I am haunted by a story from the early days of film. In 1918 the stop motion animation pioneer Willis O’Brien made a movie called “The Ghost of Slumber Mountain.” Originally 40 minutes long, the distributors of the day cut the movie down to 19 minutes highlighting the dinosaur action O’Brien created.

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Innovator: Willis H. O’Brien at work

The plot that remains features a supernatural visit to a hillbilly cabin and a time traveling telescope. It’s unclear exactly what got cut out. That version still survives, but the rest of the film is lost. Commercial pressures destroyed a rare representation of the birth of a new art form.

The title alone evoked a vision for me, and some time  during the years 2004-2005 I tackled the painting, during the ebb of my artistic efforts. I wasn’t happy with the outcome.

But what I wanted that painting to be stayed with me, to the extent many years later, probably around 2008, I painted the image again. I was back in my artistic groove by then. The second version, depicted above, captures the eeriness I was after all along.

But what about the first version, which I did display in one art show before it was put safely out of sight?

Here it is, in all its dubious glory:

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Richard Bledsoe “The Ghost of Slumber Mountain” oil on wood panel 36″ x 30″

Version One circa 2004-2005

Ugh. I can only put this out there because it is so securely in the past. I have to say, out of all my bad paintings from the time, this is one of the better ones. Even now, I like the body of the creature quite a bit, and the rocks and trees of the skyline. But overall, a swing and a miss.

Seeing this made me feel maybe I should revisit some of the other works I failed to execute the first time round. There are still visions there that deserve to be manifested.

“It is the Stuckist’s duty to explore his/her neurosis and innocence through the making of paintings and displaying them in public, thereby enriching society by giving shared form to individual experience and an individual form to shared experience.”

-The Stuckists Manifesto

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Everyone’s a critic

Our cat Motorhead passes it by without a glance

EXPLOITS: Prehistoric Inspiration

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From “The Age of Reptiles” by Rudolph Zallinger

I might not be able to say just why I became a painter, striving to create works of art. But in retrospect I can see the harbingers throughout my life that pointed out the direction I was going to be heading in.

Among my earliest memories is the collection of nature books my parents had. My favorite had a special feature: a page that folded out to show an entire vista of dinosaurs, placed in a fantastic prehistoric landscape.

I loved dinosaurs. I spent hours staring at that image.

I dreamed of becoming a paleontologist and hunting for fossils, because from what I understood paleontologists were those people who got to pay the most attention to dinosaurs-or at least, the fragments that remained of them.

Only much later did I find out that image I obsessed over then was a reproduction of “The Age of Reptiles,” a celebrated mural painted high on the walls of the Yale Peabody Museum. It was the work of artist Rudolph Zallinger; he created it in the 1940s, using the classical fresco technique of painting directly into a surface of moist plaster.

The mural measures 16 feet by 11o feet. Zallinger methodically prepared for the work with detailed sketches and preparatory drawings, but gave a moving description of what happened when he went to start on the actual fresco.

Zallinger wrote, “…at the end of October 1943 I mounted the top platform to start a line-drawing version of the whole composition. Vividly etched in my memory is my trepidation as I scanned that endless wall while holding a slender stick of charcoal in my hand, about to begin my work with a tool seemingly so inadequate to the task. However, I regained my composure and began what turned out to be a three-and-one half year project.”

Rudolph F. Zallinger working on The Age of Reptiles mural.

Rudolph Zallinger at work

These days our ideas have changed on the nature of the beasts; scientific advances now make the depictions of that mural inaccurate. But there is no denying their triumphant presence as works of art.

I can see now what moved me about dinosaurs could not have been satisfied in retrieving crumbling bones. I doubt I have the patience, meticulousness and endurance the field work of a fossil collecting scientist would have required.

What transfixed me from earliest consciousness was seeing those fabulous monsters shown as if they were alive.

Massive, muscular, with beautifully colored hides gleaming in the sunlight. Sharp teeth and watchful eyes, looking as old and predatory as time itself, filling a lost world with their awesome presence.

Now there’s no way to see such animals in reality; no way to take a photograph of them. And don’t even mention the slick, unsatisfactory blobs of CGI that clutter up a recurring series of mindless pop movies.

But such is the power of art that long before I was born, one lone man climbed up a scaffold, and with brush and pigments, made those beasts live again.

I loved dinosaurs. But what really fascinated me was a painting.

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Terrible Lizards, Beautiful Art