DAILY ART FIX: Painter April Gornik in Conversation

Art world links which caught my eye…

April Gornik | Light Wheel (2019) | Available for Sale | Artsy

April Gornik “Light Wheel” oil on linen 2019

Landscape painter April Gornik shares thoughts on art and life in this interview with a Dallas gallery.

What has been your life long interest in the landscape?

I’ve had an abiding interest in light and open space since I was a kid—I always felt better being outside than inside. I seem to have a deep impulse to reach out spiritually and emotionally to what’s furthest from me. I still can’t believe how amazing it is that we humans can conjure deep space on a two dimensional plane, which puts me squarely in opposition to the direction of painting and art in my birth century towards flat, flatter, flattest, and more and more literal. For whatever reason I try to recognize and locate myself in what is least like me. But that’s not the “subject matter” of the work, I’m not interested in proportion per se. I’m interested in letting my soul spread out in space.

April Gornik — DALLAS CONTEMPORARY

April Gornik “Sea of Light and Dark” Oil on linen 2019

Read the full article here: DALLAS CONTEMPORARY – Painter April Gornik in Conversation

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: The Volcanic, Uncontrollable Visions of a Master Reborn – Late Constable Review

Art world links which caught my eye…

Putting even Turner in the shade … Rainstorm over the Sea.

Landscape Artist John Constable Went Abstract? His Painting “Rainstorm Over the Sea”

John Constable (June 11, 1776 – March 31, 1837) is best known for idyllic, pastoral landscapes of England, the green and pleasant land. However, a current exhibit shows a different side of the painter, as a precursor of the Modern art’s drama and turbulence.

So even Constable at his most daydreamy is a modern artist now, mourning a world the factories were already starting to destroy. Everything he loved is in the past. His nostalgia is agonising. The Glebe Farm is a lovely hovel, a fairytale home – but in the oil sketch, it’s swallowed by a tangled mass of trees and storm-filled clouds. The night is coming. A Farmhouse Near the Water’s Edge has a sky like smashed glass. White shards glitter against greyness. It is as apocalyptic as an El Greco, as fragmentary as cubism. For this exhibition even makes Constable look a little like the godfather of the French avant garde. That impossible sky doesn’t just anticipate the plein air paintings of Monet or Renoir but, in its crystalline abstraction, the broken world of Cézanne and the convulsed nature of Van Gogh.

A River Scene with a Farmhouse near the Water's Edge | Art UK

John Constable “A Farmhouse Near the Water’s Edge”

Read the full article here: THE GUARDIAN – The volcanic, uncontrollable visions of a master reborn – Late Constable review

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Top 10 Landscape Artists in Modern and Contemporary Art

Art world links which caught my eye…

Landscape artists

Peter Doig “Orange Sunshine” Oil on Canvas 108″ x 79″ 1995

There is the tradition of the landscape as subject matter in more than one culture. The Chinese painted them for centuries. In Western art the landscape was usually a background element for history paintings, though as the Modern era began, focus on the landscape itself as a means of spiritual and psychological expression gained in prominence.

This article discusses 10 artists making accomplished landscape paintings now.

7. Peter Doig

Peter Doig is a Scottish born artist, who as a child moved first to the Caribbean and then to Canada, where he grew up. His works evoke a strange and ambiguous narrative, often with a cloying or foreboding atmosphere. Often described as possessing of a ‘magical realism’, the works are rendered from photographs, not to replicate the precision of the photographic image but to reference elements of memory and record. In a 2008 interview, Doig referred to his use of photographs and postcards as painting “by proxy” and noted that his paintings “made no attempt to reflect setting”. Many of Doig’s paintings are landscapes, somewhat abstract, with a number harking back to the snowy scenes of his childhood in Canada. He draws inspiration for his figurative work from various photographic sources; newspaper clippings, movie scenes, record album covers and the work of earlier artists like Edvard Munch, whose works can be described as attempts to convey a profound psychological state. His landscapes are layered formally and conceptually, and draw on assorted art historical artists, including Caspar David Friedrich, Claude Monet and Gustav Klimt.

Read the full article here: ARTLAND – Top 10 Landscape Artists in Modern and Contemporary Art

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

STUDIO: Painting in Progress


Tale1

Barely begun

The painting has begun on my 36″ x 36″ canvas. I’m using Liquitex acrylic paints to try to make a vision I beheld visible to the world.

The idea was triggered was a simple conversation. One of my sister-in-laws moved to a town in New Jersey called Forked River. She advised us the correct pronunciation of the first word for the place was actually “For-Ked,” two syllables, which amused me somehow. It seemed so archaic and grandiose.

As I pondered this the image appeared to me-not a little town in New Jersey, but an occurrence in the wilderness of the mind and spirit. The title was “A Tale of the Forked River.” Like many of my paintings, it would depict the mysterious, an experience of the uncompromising power and strangeness of life.

I saw the color scheme of yellows predominating with black and white; ragged pine trees, a stony landscape, a crouching figure inadequately armed. All revolved around the presence of The Great Bear.

I wrote the title and a brief note in a book I keep to document the visions I have. There are dozens of entries in the book. I’ll never live long enough to paint out all the ideas I’ve had, and they just keep coming. Looking back I see I dated this one December 7, 2013-a day that will live in infamy.

It takes me weeks and even months to complete a work of this size. Because I’m an intuitive artist, I kind of have to feel my way through the painting-I don’t do preparatory drawings, I work it out on the canvas, which leads to many problems and corrections. But it also leads to discoveries.

This painting has only been worked on a few times so far. It’s at the phase my wife, painter Michele Bledsoe, refers to as a train wreck. The sky is full of light but the material objects are slow to take form. I’m putting it out there in this tentative and unresolved state to share my painting process.

Tale2

“A Tale of the Forked River” work in progress