DAILY ART FIX: ‘Bored’ Security Guard Allegedly Draws Eyes on Faceless $1.3 Million Painting at Russian Gallery

Art world links which caught my eye…

Everyone’s a critic. One Russian security guard took too much action on his opinion of “That painting needs some pupils.”

A painting worth £740,000 has been destroyed after a ‘bored’ security guard drew eyes on faceless figures depicted in the artwork at a Russian gallery.

The painting was defaced by a security guard, who has not been named but is believed to be 60-years-old, who worked for a private security company, the Yeltsin Center said in a statement.

The painting, which was on loan from the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow, was damaged by the security guard after he is said to have became bored on his first day. He has since been fired.

Read the full article here: GATEWAY PUNDIT – ‘Bored’ Security Guard Allegedly Draws Eyes on Faceless $1.3 Million Painting at Russian Gallery

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

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Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

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DAILY ART FIX: The Intimate Artistic Brotherhood of the Nabis

Art world links which caught my eye…

Félix Vallotton “The Lie” oil on artist board 9″ x 13″

A recent show brought together works of a mystical early Modern art movement, the Nabis.

In 1889, a group of young avant-garde painters formed a brotherhood to reinvigorate French art. They called themselves the “Nabis,” derived from the Hebrew word for prophets. They met as students at the Académie Julian, an art school in Paris, where they chafed against the traditional education of the time. Instead, they were inspired by Paul Gauguin’s daring use of color and symbolism that went beyond the lessons of Impressionism.

Building on that foundation, the Nabis created a highly personal art. There was no one prescribed style: Each artist pursued his own vision, but the inspiration and encouragement flowed freely among the artists. When viewed together, they formed a cohesive expression marked by bright, intense hues and small, penetrating scenes of everyday life.

Pierre Bonnard “Women with a Dog” oil and ink on canvas 16″ x 12 1/2″

Read the full article here: WILLIMETTE WEEK – The Intimate Artistic Brotherhood of the Nabis

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

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DAILY ART FIX: Noguchi review – the sculptor who was high on life

Art world links which caught my eye…

Isamu Noguchi, 4 July 1947.

Isamu Noguchi, July 4, 1947.

On a recent exhibit on sculptor and designer Isamu Noguchi. He had a graceful touch to his works, which seemed to rile the author of this article.

Much of Noguchi’s appeal lies in his in-betweenness, in his ability to move between sculpture, furniture and gardens, not to mention stage sets for the ballets of Martha Graham. If you look only at any one aspect you lose something of the whole. Among the pleasures of the Barbican show are the views you get into and across its central hall, populated with a menagerie of curious forms, an array of asteroids and UFOs as heavy as granite and as light as paper.

Some are art, some are design, not that Noguchi was too concerned with the difference. “I am not a designer,” he himself said. “All my work, tables as well as sculptures, are conceived as fundamental problems of form.” This is a touch sententious – I’d say someone who designs furniture is a designer – but never mind. In the end the thing that unites his output is not any profound meaning but the joy of making. His riposte to the horrors of world wars and nuclear catastrophe was, it turns out, delight.

The Noguchi Museum new exhibition celebrating Noguchi in Greece

Read the article here: THE GUARDIAN – Noguchi review – the sculptor who was high on life

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

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DAILY ART FIX: The Neglected Afterlife of the Great Georges Braque

Art world links which caught my eye…

Georges Braque “Théière noire et deux citrons” oil on panel, 12 3/8″ x 19 1/4″ (1948)

I’ve written before on French artist Georges Braque’s quiet power. His observations translated into paint have a mysterious, poised solidity and elegance. Is he being overlooked in today’s art market of flash and trash? This article thinks so, and presents a compelling take on Braque’s works.

He merely got on with it, year after year, making still life paintings of such restraint and subtlety, and much else too. None of the paintings on these walls shouts at us. They speak of self-containment, of a quietly impassioned, ongoing dedication to the task at hand. If anything, they seem to live and breathe, and even be in defiance of any easy notion of modernity.

Georges Braque “Vase, prunes et couteau” oil and sand on canvas 12 1/4″ x 25 1/2″ (1925)

Read the full article here: HYPERALLERGIC – The Neglected Afterlife of the Great Georges Braque

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Suzanne Valadon: The Model Who Became a Master Painter

Art world links which caught my eye…

Suzanne Valadon, “Joy of Life

A model for some great Modern artists turned out to have her own natural artistic talent. A current exhibit in Philadelphia displays the works of Suzanne Valadon (September 23, 1865-April 7, 1938).

“You’re one of us!” In 1894, Edgar Degas, an Impressionist master known for being an incorrigible misogynist, couldn’t help but express his admiration before the drawings that a young brunette, recommended by Toulouse-Lautrec, had brought him at his home in Paris, on Rue Victor-Masseì. In fact, he was the first to buy a piece of work from the artist, whom he nicknamed “the terrible Maria” and praised for possessing the “genius for drawing.”

Born Marie-Cleìmentine Valadon in 1865 in the Limousin region, the young woman was already renowned in the art world of the day, but for quite a different reason. She had made a name as “Maria,” the star model of Renoir (see below) and Puvis de Chavannes. Her expressive beauty, her supple body, and her actress’s agility saw her pose for their paintings as a pink-cheeked dancer, a lady wearing long white gloves, or a stunning bather. She also embodied the contortionist mermaid painted by Austrian artist Gustav Wertheimer and inspired the tired reveler in Toulouse-Lautrec’s The Hangover.

But on the other side of the easel sat a gifted observer, not a mere muse. An innate talent, she had used chalk and pencils to sketch out frozen instants and snapshots of life on scraps of paper or the sidewalk since she was a girl. “She spent huge amounts of time in studios, so she was also watching, listening, learning,” says Nancy Ireson, chief curator of the Barnes Foundation. “And I think perhaps modeling also helps you to understand how pictures are made and what makes a good composition. She was self-taught, but she was exposed to many different artists and clearly had a great visual awareness.”

suzanne-valadon-autoportrait-self-portrait-1927-barnes-foundation

Suzanne Valadon “Self-Portrait” 1927 

Read the full article here: FRANCE-AMERIQUE – Suzanne Valadon: The Model Who Became a Master Painter

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

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WE LOST A CENTURY OF CULTURE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT ART WORLD’S FAILURES AND MANIPULATIONS. THE NEXT CENTURY CAN BE OURS.

Norman Rockwell “The Connoisseur”

The American attorney and art collector John Quinn (April 14, 1870 – July 28, 1924) had a great insight about the avant-garde works he supported in the early decades of the twentieth century. He described his times as “an age of experiment rather than accomplishment.”

Quinn was describing the rise of Modern art. As early as the late 1700s, it was clear Classical art, reiterations of the ancient achievements of the Greeks, Romans, and Renaissance, did not adequately reflect the temper of the times. But what could? Modern artists bravely tried to find out.

It’s the nature of honest experimentation that failure is more common than success. In science a theory is proposed, tests are conducted, and the results are measured and analyzed, compared to the predicted outcome. But how can novel artistic experiences be rated?

Perhaps there is a fundamental test for art. Ultimately, art is a form of spiritual communication. Does the art deliver a sense of communion, connection, the eternal fellowship of humanity in a recognizable form? That would be successful art.

Much of Modern art’s attempts failed to reach those standards. Yet extreme experiments persisted, even as the appreciation dwindled. Like Spinal Tap, Modern art’s appeal became more selective. For some powerful people, that fulfilled an important non-artistic need: a new means for status signaling.

Cy Twombly, Leda and the Swan

Sold for $52 million in 2017

Any old sap could like skillfully created, beautiful, and meaningful art. Elitists had to flip the script, and make embracing the failed experiments, the ugly and obscure, the new standard of rarified taste. The establishment cultivated a culture war to preserve their isolating Mandarin authority.

We are all the poorer for it. For over a century now institutional support has been funneled into art meant not to unite, but to divide. Museums, galleries, and wealthy patrons warped the course of artistic evolution towards alienation, transgression, and incompetence, all the better to shock the bourgeois they despised. One hundred plus years of inverted snobbery was inflicted upon us. We’ll never know what might have been, what aesthetic glories the land of the free could have produced, without that interference.

This Is What The Gentry Class Fills Our Museums With. Sad!

It’s even worse now, in the Postmodern era. As I scan the art world’s official organs, I see nothing but partisan propaganda, leftist activism misidentified as art. These feeble efforts are deader than Lenin in his glass coffin, but all those who aspire to belong to the ruling caste must shuffle past and pay homage.

One of Postmodern Art Star Banksy’s Half Assed Editorial Cartoons Masquerading as Art

Those who we trusted as the caretakers of our culture betrayed us. We’ve had no support for art that reflects the true character of the United States, our might, goodness, and freedom. But the times are changing, and art can lead the way.

Cultural thought leaders look stupid propping up the absurdity they’ve made into the status quo. They’ve got no creditability left to squander. Their institutions are beyond reform. It’s time to start over. It’s a good place to be, because an American’s natural habitat is the frontier.

Even as Postmodernism undergoes its death throes, a new understanding is rising in the populace. The people are regaining the powers which have been usurped from them. This is the beginning of the Remodern era, and it’s informed by American principles. As I state in my 2018 book, Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is the latest iteration of the American character: ordinary people working as explorers and inventors, optimistic, self-reliant and productive. The Remodernist artist formulates expressions of personal liberty in pursuit of higher meaning and significance. Remodernism is the pursuit of excellence. We don’t grovel before the current cultural gatekeepers, we want to interact with everyone. We are story tellers. We make a complex art for complex times. We are the swing of the pendulum.

The “art as experiment” analogy really isn’t quite satisfactory, because art is not like science, and conflating the two has been disastrous for our society. Elitists defensively over-intellectualized art, which is most effective as a visceral, soulful experience.

Billy Childish, an English artist who first codified Remodernism with painter Charles Thomson in 1999, described a hands-on strategy for the way forward. “The idea is painting, not having ideas about painting…In many ways I sort of like to look on myself as amateur in everything I do. The amateur does things for love, and belief, not for the mortgage.”

That’s the spirit. Look at what “amateur” politician Donald Trump achieved. He put the experts to shame – or rather, he exposed they were lying about their true goals and intentions.

Just like in our politics, no solutions for art’s crisis of relevance will come out of the corrupted hierarchies of the current professional classes. Fortunately, we don’t need anyone’s permission to create a faithful depiction of who we truly are, in art and politics both. Let’s get on with it.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: The Volcanic, Uncontrollable Visions of a Master Reborn – Late Constable Review

Art world links which caught my eye…

Putting even Turner in the shade … Rainstorm over the Sea.

Landscape Artist John Constable Went Abstract? His Painting “Rainstorm Over the Sea”

John Constable (June 11, 1776 – March 31, 1837) is best known for idyllic, pastoral landscapes of England, the green and pleasant land. However, a current exhibit shows a different side of the painter, as a precursor of the Modern art’s drama and turbulence.

So even Constable at his most daydreamy is a modern artist now, mourning a world the factories were already starting to destroy. Everything he loved is in the past. His nostalgia is agonising. The Glebe Farm is a lovely hovel, a fairytale home – but in the oil sketch, it’s swallowed by a tangled mass of trees and storm-filled clouds. The night is coming. A Farmhouse Near the Water’s Edge has a sky like smashed glass. White shards glitter against greyness. It is as apocalyptic as an El Greco, as fragmentary as cubism. For this exhibition even makes Constable look a little like the godfather of the French avant garde. That impossible sky doesn’t just anticipate the plein air paintings of Monet or Renoir but, in its crystalline abstraction, the broken world of Cézanne and the convulsed nature of Van Gogh.

A River Scene with a Farmhouse near the Water's Edge | Art UK

John Constable “A Farmhouse Near the Water’s Edge”

Read the full article here: THE GUARDIAN – The volcanic, uncontrollable visions of a master reborn – Late Constable review

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: The Contrarian Modernism of Fairfield Porter

Art world links which caught my eye…

Fairfield Porter “Jerry” oil on canvas 62″ x 37″

I used to think of Fairfield Porter as the Preppie painter. His subject matter and biographical outline makes it sound like he was a perfectly proper member of New England gentry. Only after I read his biography did I learn of darker sides of his life and personality.

His realist paintings, created while abstraction was considered the only legitimate form of advanced art,  demonstrate he was his own man.

Fairfield Porter’s turning point as a painter crops up in every account of his life. In the early 1950s, while his close friend Willem de Kooning was painting the Women series, critic Clement Greenberg remarked that, “You can’t paint that way anymore. You can’t paint figuratively today.” Porter reacted with irritation and resolve: “I thought, ‘If that’s what [Greenberg] says, I will do exactly what he says I can’t do.’ I might have become an abstract painter except for that [remark].”

Read the full article here: HYPERALLERGIC – The Contrarian Modernism of Fairfield Porter

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Yes, It’s Fine to Hate Modern Art

Art world links which caught my eye…

Bad Artist Banksy Makes Bank with Bunk

The author of this article gets one thing wrong. Modern art has been over for decades. The fraudulent artwork being made now should be referred to as Postmodern, an even more corrupt governing philosophy. Nevertheless, the underlying problems are well described:

NFTs are absolutely perfect for the art world. Ever since art became modern, ever since old forms of art were considered to have lost their influence (like, making a Renaissance-style sculpture can no longer influence thinking of a modern man), there has been this low-effort conceptual teasing present in the art of artists pushing the envelope, testing how much is too much. Marcel Duchamp signed a urinal in 1917. Robert Rauschenberg erased a de Kooning drawing in 1953.

That envelope pushing eventually became about money. Salvador Dalí, an artist that was very openly fond of money, sold tens of thousands of signed blank sheets. Many after Dalí have done the same thing, escalating the joke until we got to bananas duct-taped to a gallery wall, which sold for $150,000 (several times). Selling worthless things to people for exorbitant amounts of money, while laughing in their faces for it, became integral to modern art.

Read the full article here: YAHOO FINANCE – Yes, It’s Fine to Hate Modern Art

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

Artist Quotes About America

Reposted from July 3, 2017 

Thornton Dial “Don’t Matter How Raggly The Flag, It Still Got To Tie Us Together”

“If we going to change the world, we got to look at the little man.”

Thornton Dial

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Happy Independence Day!

In large part, the creative classes are saturated in globalist propaganda. The institutional indoctrination is very thorough, and of course most funding opportunities rely on conforming to the elitist gentry agenda.  Sad!

However, there are examples of artists who spoke their minds about the fantastic nature of the American experience. In the United States our culture is currently experiencing the death throes of manipulative, oppressive Postmodernism. As we enter the new era of Remodernism, the return of art as a revelation, expect to see more artists express the ethos of liberty in deeds, words and pictures.

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Andy Warhol “Van Heusen (Ronald Reagan)”

“I met someone on the street who said wasn’t it great that we’re going to have a movie star for president, that it was so Pop, and when you think about it like that, it is great, it’s so American.”

-Andy Warhol

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Thomas Eakins “The Champion Single Sculls”

“Of course, it is well to go abroad and see the works of the old masters, but Americans… must strike out for themselves, and only by doing this will we create a great and distinctly American art.”

-Thomas Eakins

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Arthur Dove “Me and the Moon”

“What constitutes American painting?… things may be in America, but it’s what is in the artist that counts. What do we call ‘American’ outside of painting? Inventiveness, restlessness, speed, change..”

-Arthur Dove

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Jacob Lawrence “The Migration Series Panel 58”


“Maybe…humanity to you has been reduced to the sterility of the line, the cube, the circle, and the square; devoid of all feeling, cold and highly esoteric. If this is so, I can well understand why you cannot portray the true America. It is because you have lost all feeling for man.”

-Jacob Lawrence

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Willem De Kooning “Dark Pond”

“I feel sometimes an American artist must feel, like a baseball player or something – a member of a team writing American history.”

-Willem De Kooning

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Georgia O’Keeffe “Cow Skull: Red, White and Blue”

“One can not be an American by going about saying that one is an American. It is necessary to feel America, like America, love America and then work.”

-Georgia O’Keeffe

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Jack Kerouac “Untitled”

“I felt like a million dollars; I was adventuring in the crazy American night.”

-Jack Kerouac

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Grant Wood “Stone City, Iowa”

“I had to go to France to appreciate Iowa.”

-Grant Wood

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Richard Bledsoe “The Pop Star”

Remodernism is the latest iteration of the American character: ordinary people working as explorers and inventors, optimistic, self-reliant and productive.”

-Richard Bledsoe

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RICHARD BLEDSOE is a visual story teller; a painter of fables and parables. He received his BFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University. Richard has been an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, in both the United States and internationally. He lives and paints happily in Phoenix, Arizona, with his wife Michele and cat Motorhead. He is the author of Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is not a style of art, it is a form of motivation. We express the universal language of inspired humanity.

We do not imitate what came before. We find in ourselves the same divine essence of love and excitement which has inspired masterpieces throughout history. We are strengthened by drawing on traditions thousands of years old.

We integrate the bold, visionary efforts of the Modern era into a holistic, meaningful expression of contemporary life. Remodernism seeks a humble maturity which heals the fragmentation and contradictions of Modernism, and obliterates the narcissistic lies of Postmodernism.

Remodernism is the return of art as a revelation.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!