DAILY ART FIX: Video- Bringing Museum Dioramas to Life

Art world links which caught my eye…

When I was growing up, I was fascinated by the elaborate dinosaur and nature dioramas at the Smithsonian Institute museums in Washington, DC. I returned there several years ago and was horrified that all those compelling, beautiful displays seem to have been removed. However, per this 2012 video, the museum diorama is not a lost art.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

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Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

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DAILY ART FIX: My Encounter with Gwar, the Artist Collective That Brings Heavy Metal Fever Dreams to Life

A true story…

VIDEO: Trailer for GWAR Documentary Let There Be GWAR - Vannen, Inc.

Gwar: The Boys in the Band

In the 1990s, after I graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University, I stayed on in Richmond, Virginia. One of the city’s claims to fame at the time was Gwar-a metal band that mixed muppets, gore, and slapstick into a fake-blood soaked spectacle. I remember one show of theirs I attended where they must have put too much color into the various fluids they sprayed into the audience; even the hairs on my arm were dyed pink for days afterwards.

Gwar in Action

There came a point where Gwar was banned from performing in costume in their own hometown, due to the over-the-top grossness and silly obscenity of it all. They used to do local shows as Rawg, where they would perform the music without the theatrics.

At the time I was the chairman of the exhibition committee of Artspace, an artist-run cooperative gallery. I had a great idea: if Gwar can’t use their props and costumes in Richmond, what not put on an art show with them? I imagined national press attention, MTV coverage, and a spirited debate about free expression.

The Gwar guys didn’t act like rock stars. They were always just hanging around the local scene like anyone else. I was able to get an introduction pretty quickly. One afternoon I met up with singer Dave “Oderus Urungus” Brockie for a tour of Slave Pit Incorporated, the facility where they manufactured their elaborate outfits and gear. There were rubber body parts everywhere; I remember there was a big latex O J Simpson, who was very topical at the time. Brockie was gracious and supportive of the idea of an art show. It all would have made for a great exhibit.

Long story short, Artspace decided they couldn’t get insurance for an event like this. I think many of the gallery members were too intimated by the crassness as well. The idea was dropped, and Gwar continued to grow their international cult following.

Here is a relic of those times: a little rubber souvenir I found one day on the cobblestones of a Richmond alleyway:

Dave Brockie sadly passed away in 2014. However, the band continues to this day, as recently covered in Atlas Obscura:

The studio, as it looked on an average day in 2017.

Slave Pit Incorporated in 2017

This is the studio that creates custom costumes, sets, and stage props for two-time Grammy-nominated thrash metal band GWAR. The group’s costume- and FX-fueled live comedy-horror operas won international attention in the early 1990s and continue to disgust and delight audiences today. Concertgoers can expect things like huge, grotesque monsters raging amid fiery explosions, as band members dressed like satanic space-ogres shred on guitars with headstocks that spew fake blood.

The artists working here are responsible for bringing the show to life. They’re considered band members and work on everything from storylining albums and scripting stage productions to filming music videos and writing branded graphic novels. And sometimes they play monsters onstage. The team consists of two full-time artistic directors and a few dozen contract contributors. Most attended art school at nearby Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU).

Read the full article here: ATLAS OBSCURA – The Artist Collective That Brings Heavy Metal Fever Dreams to Life

Gwar - Wikipedia

Dave Brockie: RIP

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

WE LOST A CENTURY OF CULTURE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT ART WORLD’S FAILURES AND MANIPULATIONS. THE NEXT CENTURY CAN BE OURS.

Norman Rockwell “The Connoisseur”

The American attorney and art collector John Quinn (April 14, 1870 – July 28, 1924) had a great insight about the avant-garde works he supported in the early decades of the twentieth century. He described his times as “an age of experiment rather than accomplishment.”

Quinn was describing the rise of Modern art. As early as the late 1700s, it was clear Classical art, reiterations of the ancient achievements of the Greeks, Romans, and Renaissance, did not adequately reflect the temper of the times. But what could? Modern artists bravely tried to find out.

It’s the nature of honest experimentation that failure is more common than success. In science a theory is proposed, tests are conducted, and the results are measured and analyzed, compared to the predicted outcome. But how can novel artistic experiences be rated?

Perhaps there is a fundamental test for art. Ultimately, art is a form of spiritual communication. Does the art deliver a sense of communion, connection, the eternal fellowship of humanity in a recognizable form? That would be successful art.

Much of Modern art’s attempts failed to reach those standards. Yet extreme experiments persisted, even as the appreciation dwindled. Like Spinal Tap, Modern art’s appeal became more selective. For some powerful people, that fulfilled an important non-artistic need: a new means for status signaling.

Cy Twombly, Leda and the Swan

Sold for $52 million in 2017

Any old sap could like skillfully created, beautiful, and meaningful art. Elitists had to flip the script, and make embracing the failed experiments, the ugly and obscure, the new standard of rarified taste. The establishment cultivated a culture war to preserve their isolating Mandarin authority.

We are all the poorer for it. For over a century now institutional support has been funneled into art meant not to unite, but to divide. Museums, galleries, and wealthy patrons warped the course of artistic evolution towards alienation, transgression, and incompetence, all the better to shock the bourgeois they despised. One hundred plus years of inverted snobbery was inflicted upon us. We’ll never know what might have been, what aesthetic glories the land of the free could have produced, without that interference.

This Is What The Gentry Class Fills Our Museums With. Sad!

It’s even worse now, in the Postmodern era. As I scan the art world’s official organs, I see nothing but partisan propaganda, leftist activism misidentified as art. These feeble efforts are deader than Lenin in his glass coffin, but all those who aspire to belong to the ruling caste must shuffle past and pay homage.

One of Postmodern Art Star Banksy’s Half Assed Editorial Cartoons Masquerading as Art

Those who we trusted as the caretakers of our culture betrayed us. We’ve had no support for art that reflects the true character of the United States, our might, goodness, and freedom. But the times are changing, and art can lead the way.

Cultural thought leaders look stupid propping up the absurdity they’ve made into the status quo. They’ve got no creditability left to squander. Their institutions are beyond reform. It’s time to start over. It’s a good place to be, because an American’s natural habitat is the frontier.

Even as Postmodernism undergoes its death throes, a new understanding is rising in the populace. The people are regaining the powers which have been usurped from them. This is the beginning of the Remodern era, and it’s informed by American principles. As I state in my 2018 book, Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is the latest iteration of the American character: ordinary people working as explorers and inventors, optimistic, self-reliant and productive. The Remodernist artist formulates expressions of personal liberty in pursuit of higher meaning and significance. Remodernism is the pursuit of excellence. We don’t grovel before the current cultural gatekeepers, we want to interact with everyone. We are story tellers. We make a complex art for complex times. We are the swing of the pendulum.

The “art as experiment” analogy really isn’t quite satisfactory, because art is not like science, and conflating the two has been disastrous for our society. Elitists defensively over-intellectualized art, which is most effective as a visceral, soulful experience.

Billy Childish, an English artist who first codified Remodernism with painter Charles Thomson in 1999, described a hands-on strategy for the way forward. “The idea is painting, not having ideas about painting…In many ways I sort of like to look on myself as amateur in everything I do. The amateur does things for love, and belief, not for the mortgage.”

That’s the spirit. Look at what “amateur” politician Donald Trump achieved. He put the experts to shame – or rather, he exposed they were lying about their true goals and intentions.

Just like in our politics, no solutions for art’s crisis of relevance will come out of the corrupted hierarchies of the current professional classes. Fortunately, we don’t need anyone’s permission to create a faithful depiction of who we truly are, in art and politics both. Let’s get on with it.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: The Volcanic, Uncontrollable Visions of a Master Reborn – Late Constable Review

Art world links which caught my eye…

Putting even Turner in the shade … Rainstorm over the Sea.

Landscape Artist John Constable Went Abstract? His Painting “Rainstorm Over the Sea”

John Constable (June 11, 1776 – March 31, 1837) is best known for idyllic, pastoral landscapes of England, the green and pleasant land. However, a current exhibit shows a different side of the painter, as a precursor of the Modern art’s drama and turbulence.

So even Constable at his most daydreamy is a modern artist now, mourning a world the factories were already starting to destroy. Everything he loved is in the past. His nostalgia is agonising. The Glebe Farm is a lovely hovel, a fairytale home – but in the oil sketch, it’s swallowed by a tangled mass of trees and storm-filled clouds. The night is coming. A Farmhouse Near the Water’s Edge has a sky like smashed glass. White shards glitter against greyness. It is as apocalyptic as an El Greco, as fragmentary as cubism. For this exhibition even makes Constable look a little like the godfather of the French avant garde. That impossible sky doesn’t just anticipate the plein air paintings of Monet or Renoir but, in its crystalline abstraction, the broken world of Cézanne and the convulsed nature of Van Gogh.

A River Scene with a Farmhouse near the Water's Edge | Art UK

John Constable “A Farmhouse Near the Water’s Edge”

Read the full article here: THE GUARDIAN – The volcanic, uncontrollable visions of a master reborn – Late Constable review

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

ARTISTS: Leonard Greco

Leonard Greco “Self Portrait of the Artist as Saint Anthony of the Desert Facing Death” Oil on panel 18″ x 24″ inches 2020

Just as art provides a microcosm of life, the current state of the establishment art world provides a microcosm of the real world. Our cultural institutions have become massively tainted and  dysfunctional. The failures we are enduring were not inevitable or accidental; rather, they are the result of systematic, calculated actions by a corrupt cabal. They’ve betrayed the legitimate functions of the institutions they’ve usurped in favor of their own self-aggrandizing agendas; their rotten practices range from the financial to the spiritual.

But I have great hope for the future, because while the institutions are infiltrated and compromised, the human need for artistic accomplish persists in the people. True art survives outside the ruthlessly filtered cloisters the elitists have cultivated.

My beliefs are confirmed by artists like Leonard Greco. He is pursuing a deeply personal vision, combining native talent with all the skill and craft a lifetime of patient dedication can provide. His imagery is grotesque and surreal, in the tradition of masters like Hieronymus Bosch and Jan Brueghel. While monstrous, the works manage to be beautiful and comical as well.

Greco acknowledges humanity’s conflicts and fallen nature like a medieval morality play or a fairy tale might. There is transcendence in the beauty of his vibrant colors, the complex compositions, and the precise resolution he brings to his paintings and sculptures. He does not shy away from the darkness, but uses art to show the redemption of graceful love. Greco understands how the eternal function of art as an expression and a means for inspiration.

Leonard Greco “Saint George & the Dragon” Oil on panel 16″ x 20″ 2021

Leonard Greco was gracious enough to share some comments on his art and methods in a recent email exchange.

QUESTION: How did you initially get involved in the visual arts? Who were some of your inspirations?

Leonard Greco: There hasn’t been a period of my life where art-making wasn’t a significant element of my identity. Early on I picked up pencil and brush. I was fortunate in having an eccentric grandmother who was very creative, a gifted amateur in all manner of artistic expression: oil painting, stained glass, fine jewelry making, silversmithing, set design.

We saw one another infrequently, but I treasure the memories of time spent in her thrilling company, she was certainly a great, if erratic, inspiration. 

Q: How do you create your paintings?  

 LG: I’m primarily a painter in oil. I am also an avid draughtsman, my painting start first in copious pencil studies ( I try to draw daily). I then, once I have a mental roadmap, begin the painting process. This process is laborious, in part because I am self taught and very well may be reinventing the wheel but also because the paintings I most admire, namely northern medieval and Renaissance panel paintings, possess a fastidious lapidary finish. Wishing to emulate that effect takes a great deal of time. I work with absurdly small brushes and there are far too many studio days when the territory claimed is mere inches of the canvas. 

In addition to easel painting I also create textile art, frequently near life sized fiber constructions that I call “stuffed paintings”; they are hybrid works, part sculpture, part painting.


Leonard Greco “Robin Goodfellow” Mixed textile Life size 2019


Q: What do you hope to convey through your work? 

LG: I wish to create a mythic timeless space that in spite of its  unreality resonates as familiar. I am inspired by my dreams which are rich, highly symbolic and frequently terrifying. They possess a dim grey light , frequently shadowless, I try to capture that haunting atmosphere. 

I am also trying to convey the universal truths we humans share, truths concerning life, death, one’s soul, worldliness in all its fraught excesses  and the pursuit of the true, highly individual light given to us by our Maker. This search I think is best sought through myth and story telling. I am essentially a myth maker, a Fairy-taler.

Leonard Greco “The Knight’s Tale (after Chaucer)” Acrylic on canvas panel 18″ x 24″ 2020



Q: What have been some of the highlights of your artistic journey and career?


LG: Very early on I had unearned solo shows, I was far too young, far too undeveloped and frankly just naive, smug and stupid. Since those halcyon youthful days there has been time spent in the desert of isolation and inwardness. I had the good fortune to have a solo show called Leonard Greco’s Fairyland in 2019 (  https://leonardgreco.me/fairyland/ ) one more deserved, more intentional and most gratifying. Since that time I’ve acquired more collectors, have been included in more exhibitions ( including permanent collections) and looking forward to further collaborations and opportunities. But it’s been an arduous and discouraging journey, to be an artist requires  courage, tenacity, grueling, frequently unrewarded labor and limitless faith.
 

Q: Are you optimistic about the direction the arts are going in? Why? 


LG: I am not. Pessimism is so easy to succumb to and every century has had its doomsayers yet I am hard pressed not to feel a sense of despair when confronting a society of art elites hellbent on disregarding the history, beauty, craft and spirituality of our shared Western tradition. Without indulging in a screed against identity obsessed post modernism, what I encounter routinely in public museums and private galleries leaves me disheartened, cynical, uninspired and bluntly, quite bored. I never imagined being bored by contemporary art.
 

Q: Why does art matter in the 21st century? 

LG: For starters I hope for a 22nd century, one that can look back to the 21st and reflect upon how fascinating and creative we were. Century after century, man has spoken to the next age. Through literature , art , music we send forth our best, for ourselves, for our Maker, for our contemporaries and in some way for our future kin. The art making of our day frequently reflects narcissistically upon a cynical,  ironic age, one not given to a pursuit broader than pleasure and paper thin superficiality and when it does venture beyond its own navel, focuses not on eternal truths but instead is devoted to an identity politics of grudges, chip-on-the-shoulder score settling, a highly honed aesthetic of anger and retribution. It rarely creates engaging, inspiring or enlightening art. I require art that nourishes, nurtures and inspires my fullest aspirations, all too often when I am confronted with contemporary work deemed  “meaningful” or “ powerful” by the art elites, I am instead left with a sense of extreme impoverishment.

Q: Why does art matter to you?

LG: It saved me, it offered hope and a sense of purpose. That’s so overblown and absurdly dramatic but it’s true. My boyhood was one of poverty, materially and spiritually. There was great violence in my home as well, little peace and no beauty other than the natural God given sort. Yet somehow, miraculously, in our attic there were discarded family treasures: old Bibles, Victorian scrapbooks and most tantalizingly, art history books belonging to my above mentioned Nana. Thumbing through these books, possessing what now would be considered the most minimal of images, I was nonetheless transported to the world of the ancient Egyptians, the vase paintings of the Greeks, the Medici court. It was a revelation, I wanted desperately to draw like Durer, I recall specifically taking pencil to tablet and with Durer’s patch of turf in mind, meticulously recording a dandelion. 

My life was so desolate in my youth, deep, seemingly unbearable depressions, despair and shame  in being a misunderstood gay kid , suicidal fantasies and yet through it all I drew. This determined practice allowed me to see myself as an artist despite the odds; the odds are still there yet I still cling to hope for what else is there?

Visit Leonard Greco on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leonardgrecoart/

Leonard Greco “The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus” Oil on canvas 48″ x 36″ 2019

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: A prized $400 million art collection given to Seattle Art Museum goes on view

Art world links which caught my eye…

A portrait of Jane Lang Davis by Andy Warhol greets art lovers at the entrance to the exhibit “Frisson: The Richard E. Lang and Jane Lang Davis Collection” at Seattle Art Museum. (Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times)

Andy Warhol “Jane Lang Davis”

It began simply enough: with the wife’s desire to decorate a new home. It lead to an art collection worth $400 million. Now the works have been donated to the Seattle Art Museum.

“It’s a chance to peek at the midcentury art movement not through the eyes of scholars, but the eyes of people who looked carefully and only bought what they loved.” – The Seattle Times

“Frisson: The Richard E. Lang and Jane Lang Davis Collection” opens 10/15 and The Seattle Times is giving the scoop on what viewers can expect. The landmark Lang Collection gift by the Friday Foundation is comprised of 19 outstanding artworks that transform SAM’s holdings of postwar art. 

Lee Krasner’s 1960 work “Night Watch” was painted during a long season of insomnia after several heavy losses, including the death of her husband,  Jackson Pollock. It’s part of SAM’s “Frisson” exhibit. (Spike Mafford / Zocalo Studios)

Lee Krasner “Night Watch”

See the full article here: SEATTLE TIMES – A prized $400 million art collection given to Seattle Art Museum goes on view

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Mixing It Up – Painting Today

Art world links which caught my eye…

Allison Katz “Adult Services” oil, acrylic and iridescent pigments on linen, 200 x 160 cm

The art world is a fashion victim, subject to trends and whims. After enduring several cycles of “painting is dead” propaganda over the last few decades, the exhibition Mixing It Up shows painting is back in the UK – as long as the artists participate in Postmodern politically correct muddled thinking.

Above all, the paintings in this exhibition are resonantly ambiguous. These works invite viewers to recruit their own imaginations in working out different ways to interpret them, whilst often questioning how their social reception might shift among different audiences. Whether reflecting on aspects of present-day experience or framing old stories from fresh perspectives, they draw on painting’s capacity for linking seemingly unrelated things (and the ideas and feelings associated with them) in ways that provoke us to find meanings for them.

Mixing It Up looks like a mixed bag, but I’m always glad to see more painting getting done.

See the full article here: FAD MAGAZINE – Mixing It Up – Painting Today

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: The Queen of England’s Inaccessible Art Collection

Art world links which caught my eye…

Old Master paintings removed from the Picture Gallery at Buckingham Palace for the first time in almost 45 years in preparation for landmark exhibition.

The British monarchs have been collecting art for centuries. Most of the time the works are not available for public viewing, which leads to an article of complaint:

The Royal Collection is managed by the Royal Collection Trust, whose function stipulates it ensures “as much of the Royal Collection as possible can be seen by members of the public,” and “Access to the Royal Collection is broadened, in person, in print and online, and increased to ensure that as many people as possible are able to enjoy the Collection.” All these impediments — such limited availability during the year, a prohibitively high entry fee, little to no advertisement, and display arrangements less for examining the art than for conveying overall decorative impact — undermine the supposed goal of increasing and broadening access for enjoyment. The incongruity is amplified by the hyperbolic reviews accompanying the exhibition where the public can actually see the work. The public is thus obliged to get to this show before it is dismantled.

Read the full article here: HYPERALLERGIC – The Queen of England’s Inaccessible Art Collection

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: 13 Key Shows in Mary Boone Gallery’s History

Art world links which caught my eye…

From the Archives: 13 Key Shows

Gallerist Mary Boone

From 2019, a reflection on a sort of rags to riches to rags story. Gallerist Mary Boone was at the epicenter of the 1980s art boom. She represented highly successful artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Eric Fischl. Boone remained an art world powerhouse…until she went to prison for tax issues. This article reviews some of the notable and notorious exhibits held at her gallery.

Jean-Michel Basquiat

May 5, 1984–May 26, 1984

The show: Jean-Michel Basquiat’s first exhibition with Mary Boone is one of the most storied exhibitions in the gallery’s history. Having already shown with Gagosian Gallery, Annina Nosei Gallery, Galerie Bruno Bischofberger, and Marlborough Gallery, Basquiat had already become well-known, and his Boone show only helped build excitement around his career. Works on view there have ended up in notable collections—Deaf (1984), for example, is now held by the Broad museum in Los Angeles.

What ARTnews said: “Basquiat insists on imposing his vocabulary of signs and squiggles, but then he makes them either very easy to understand or superfluous. His paintings are offhand, disorderly and random, mixing rough and smooth, drawn and barely drawn, to create an impression of facility and ease. The painter clearly tries not try, going slack instead of slick. Ultimately, though, the bright surface supplants an internal glow, toys replace people, a big smile substitutes for happiness.” —Eric Jay

Jean‐Michel Basquiat - Deaf, 1984, acrylic and oilstick on canvas

Jean-Michel Basquiat “Deaf” acrylic and oilstick on canvas 66 ” x 60″

Read the Full Article Here: ARTNEWS – From the Archives: 13 Key Shows in Mary Boone Gallery’s History

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAIL ART FIX: William Blake: The greatest visionary in 200 years

Art world links which caught my eye…

Pity, 1795: “In my brain are studies … filled with books and pictures of old which I wrote and painted … and those works are the delight and study of archangels,” wrote Blake

William Blake “Pity”

There was one time I was moved to tears in a museum. It was in 1997, in the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. They were holding an exhibit of William Blake’s illustrations of the Book of Job. The images were so small (about 7″ x 5″), but their impact was vast. I was overwhelmed by their presence.

William Blake “Job’s Sons and Daughters Overwhelmed by Satan”

In 2019 the Tate Museum held an exhibit of Blake’s work that I wish I could have seen.

Tate’s comprehensive retrospective, its first in nearly a generation, features more than 300 drawings, paintings, watercolours, woodcuts, and illustrated books, and provides the perfect opportunity to explore the secrets behind Blake’s ever-evolving legacy and to contemplate the emergence in popular imagination of a London eccentric whose ambition was to help us “see a World in a Grain of Sand / And a Heaven in a Wild Flower”, to “hold Infinity in the palm of [our] hand / And Eternity in an hour”.

See the full article here: BBC – William Blake: The greatest visionary in 200 years

William Blake “Behemoth and Leviathan”

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RICHARD BLEDSOE is a visual story teller; a painter of fables and parables. He received his BFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University. Richard has been an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, in both the United States and internationally. He lives and paints happily in Phoenix, Arizona, with his wife Michele and cat Motorhead. He is the author of Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is not a style of art, it is a form of motivation. We express the universal language of inspired humanity.

We do not imitate what came before. We find in ourselves the same divine essence of love and excitement which has inspired masterpieces throughout history. We are strengthened by drawing on traditions thousands of years old.

We integrate the bold, visionary efforts of the Modern era into a holistic, meaningful expression of contemporary life. Remodernism seeks a humble maturity which heals the fragmentation and contradictions of Modernism, and obliterates the narcissistic lies of Postmodernism.

Remodernism is the return of art as a revelation.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!