DAILY ART FIX: Music Video -‘The Lively Arts’ by the Damned, Illustrated by Teenagers

Art world links which caught my eye…

From the Damned’s 1980 Black Album. This Youtube version was illustrated by teenagers:

Innovation Day 2013 at Dixons City Academy in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK. I had a class of 13, 14, and 15 year olds for the day. I showed them my own version of I don’t wanna grow up, by the Ramones first. They each got a line from the song (they didn’t have a clue what the song was). By the afternoon they had worked together to create their own illustrated Damned song, and they loved it. Who says it’s impossible getting a bit of Punk into the classroom?!

Lyrics
I’m gonna stay in bed all day
I’m not gonna hear a word you say
It’s gonna be a life of style for me
Electric blankets, pillows, fire and TV
Take a look outside
Those lively arts are on the slide
And culture’s just a bore
When you’re angry young and poor
And if I got my way
Those idle rich would pay
When the discussion starts
On the lively arts
I’m gonna be a lazy slob
Sod the folks and sod the job
And tell the foreman that I’m ill
And in a week I’ll be here still
Yes I will
Take a look outside
Those lively arts are on the slide
And culture’s just a bore
When you’re angry young and poor
And if I got my way
Those idle rich would pay
When the discussion starts
On the lively arts

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DAILY ART FIX: William Blake’s famous flop of an exhibition and the critic who described him as ‘an unfortunate lunatic’

Art world links which caught my eye…

William Blake “The Spiritual Form of Nelson Guiding Leviathan”

Part of the legacy of visionary artist William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) acts as a warning. It demonstrates how innovative artistic genius can go unrecognized by the status quo. A new book William Blake vs the World, explores how Blake was ignored and even abused by his contemporaries, such as the time when he dared to set up his own 19th century pop up gallery over his brother’s haberdashery. A critic named Robert Hunter created his own terrible legacy, and will forever be remembered as one who failed to appreciate Blake’s achievements in real time.

For the rest of the article Hunt delights in being vicious, patronising and cruel. He seems intent on putting this working- class creator in his place. It is hard not to see him as one of the uninspired “Hirelings in the Camp, the Court, & the University” that Blake attacks in the preface to Milton. “The poor man fancies himself a great master”, Hunt wrote, “and has painted a few wretched pictures, some of which are unintelligible allegory, others an attempt at sober character by caricature representation, and the whole ‘blotted and blurred,’ and very badly drawn. These he calls an Exhibition, of which he has published a Catalogue, or rather a farrago of nonsense, unintelligibleness, and egregious vanity, the wild effusions of a distempered brain.”

William Blake “The Spiritual Form of Pitt Guiding Behemoth”

Read the full article here: ART NEWSPAPER – William Blake’s famous flop of an exhibition and the critic who described him as ‘an unfortunate lunatic’

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Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

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DAILY ART FIX: Long Overlooked, Leading 20th-Century American Artist Doris Lee Is Celebrated Once Again in Traveling Exhibition

Art world links which caught my eye…

Doris Lee “The View, Woodstock” Oil on canvas, 27 1/2″ x 44″ 1946

Doris Lee was an American painter who could be seen as as part of the Regionalist art movement, producing representations of what is now derided as “fly over country.” She is currently the focus of a traveling exhibition.

Simple Pleasures: The Art of Doris Lee features 77 of the most notable and compelling works of art by Doris Lee (1905-1983). Using a vibrant color palette, Lee sparks feelings of playfulness and humor in her paintings, drawings, prints, and commissioned commercial designs for fabric and pottery. Simple Pleasures includes works by the artist spanning from the 1930s through the 1960s from both public and private collections and gives overdue recognition to Lee’s significant contributions to American art. A selection of ephemera, such as product advertisements for the American Tobacco Company and General Foods who commissioned paintings from Lee, will also be included in the exhibition.

Doris Lee “Off to Auction” Oil on canvas, 24½” by 35½” 1942

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

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DAILY ART FIX: The Art of Memes 7

Art world links which caught my eye…

When a classic enters an icon-Pulp Fiction at the Diner.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

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DAILY ART FIX: The Philosophy Books that Inspired Francis Bacon’s Art

Art world links which caught my eye…

Francis Bacon- Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud

Francis Bacon “Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud” (1964)

Painter Francis Bacon lived in his infamously messy studio. Books of all kinds were amongst the detritus, including works that shaped (or misshaped) the intellectual life of the 20th century.

Francis Bacon read books just like he painted: deep, dark, and complex. The Irish figurative painter was said to have had an enormous library of books sprawled across his London studio, from modernist giants like T.S.Eliot, Joseph Conrad, and Marcel Proust, to Friedrich Nietzsche, Gilles Deleuze, Sigmund Freud, and Jacques Lacan reflecting the artist’s explicit interest in philosophy and psychoanalysis. In a 1966 interview with British art critic David Sylvester, he claimed to know some of these books “by heart”.

“I call it my imagination material,” he told French photographer Francis Giacobetti in 1991, during what would become his final interview before his death the following year. “I need to visualise things that lead me to other forms or subjects, details, images that influence my nervous system and transform the basic idea.” Like Bacon’s own artwork, which could be described as spectacles of horror – visceral, distorted images of crucifixions, mutilations, and monsters – his chosen literature was equally transgressive, often opposing existing philosophical and political ideas of their time…

Bacon’s artworks, while extremely personal, are also a product of their time: the shadowy aftermath of World War II and the horrors of the Holocaust. It’s a subject explored by Steiner in In Bluebeard’s Castle, which – originally published in 1971 – is one of the key cultural texts on post-World War II society, and a popular read for artists and cultural critics alike. Best described as a reflection on the death of western culture, Steiner argues that classical culture died with the Holocaust.

Read the full article here: DAZED – The Philosophy Books that Inspired Francis Bacon’s Art

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

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DAILY ART FIX: Uncomfortable Discoveries – First in a Series of Posts Examining the Riace Bronzes

Art world links which caught my eye…

The Riace Bronzes: Warriors Rescued From the Sea - WSJ

Two bronze Greek sculptures dating back from between 460 and 420 B.C were discovered in 1972. Like I always say, art shows us who were are, and art shows us how to be. This article discusses the intimidating realizations about life in the ancient world this art reveals, so different than our corrupted Postmodern mediocrity. Thanks to reader Richard Patton for the link!

Indeed, that warriors should not only observe, but emulate statues like the Bronzes is apparent when one examines the particulars of warfare and armament in the Greek classical age. City states of this era fought land battles in formations of warriors known as the phalanx. Each man, or hoplite, was responsible for providing his own arms and armor, which included spear, shield, helmet, and thorax, or breastplate. The thorax, for those who had the means, would be made from bronze, weighing between 30 and 40 pounds, exactly fitted to the torso of each wearer for comfort and protection. Typically, the bronze thorax would be fashioned with a depiction of idealized musculature, including pectorals and well-conditioned abdominals. Therefore, one would see the Greek warrior armed for battle as half man and half statue, an animated being of blood and metal. The warrior in donning his armor replaces his skin with a hard surface adapted for close combat, and becomes like the bronze gods enshrined in the high temples of the city.

Read the full article here: SUBSTACK – Uncomfortable Discoveries – First in a Series of Posts Examining the Riace Bronzes

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

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DAILY ART FIX: Tim Klein Mixes Up Puzzle Pieces And The Results Are Surreal

Art world links which caught my eye…

Montage Puzzle Art by Tim Klein

Tim Klein ““Pig Jaw Suzzle #2”

Surrealism uses puzzling presentations to trigger unexpected insights into the nature of reality. One artist is literally using puzzles to accomplish this.

Puzzle enthusiast Washington-based artist Tim Klein has been creating montages out of jigsaw puzzles for 25 years. For his work, Klein uses vintage puzzles from the 1970s-90s, the selection of which can take years: “It’s an obsessive but enjoyable treasure hunt,” he says…

But it’s not as simple as throwing some pieces together, as Klein notes:

“Over the years I’ve developed an intuitive feel for spotting [puzzles] that are likely to be useful to me, based on their imagery, brand, age, piece count, etc. But even so, matching up vintage puzzles takes luck, patience, and the tenacity of a treasure hunter! I own stacks and stacks of puzzles that I call my “art supplies”, some of which have been waiting years for a suitable mate to appear.”

Montage Puzzle Art by Tim Klein

Tim Klein “King of the Road”

Read the full article here: ART SHEEP – Tim Klein Mixes Up Puzzle Pieces And The Results Are Surreal

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

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DAILY ART FIX: The History of the Color Red: From Ancient Paintings to Louboutin Shoes

Art world links which caught my eye...

History of the Color Red

Red Pigment

The colors of paint are created by various minerals, chemicals, or organic substances. This article reviews the various means used to create the color of passion, red.

The Jewish Bride by Rembrandt

Rembrandt “The Jewish Bride,”  1666

Carmine

As with all lake pigments, carmine is made from organic matter, as opposed to minerals used in colors like ultramarine or vermilion. Made from cochineal, tiny scale insects that live on cacti, the pigment made its way to Europe in the early 16th century when Spanish conquistadors noticed the brilliant reds used by the Aztecs. Carmine made a beautiful, deep crimson that was used by nearly all of the great 15th and 16th century painters. Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Velázquez are just some of the painters that used carmine to obtain a rich red hue. The pigment must be used carefully, however, as it can change color when exposed to light.

Fun fact: Cochineal insects were a valuable European import in the 16th century, coming in third after gold and silver. Used both in paints and dyes, the resulting color was a symbol of wealth. Many European aristocrats would wear clothing dyed with cochineal, as it produced a red much stronger than the kermes varieties already available in Europe.

Read the full article here: MY MODERN MET – The History of the Color Red: From Ancient Paintings to Louboutin Shoes

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

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DAILY ART FIX: Mythmakers: Winslow Homer And Frederic Remington

Art world links which caught my eye…

“The Stampede” by Frederic Remington (1861-1909), 1908. Oil on canvas. Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, Okla., gift of the Thomas Gilcrease Foundation.

Frederic Remington “The Stampede”

Two great American painters went through their artistic peaks around the same time, despite a great difference in their ages and locations. A 2021 exhibit highlighted what they shared.

Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington are both mythic American artists. Their artworks represent what – for differing groups of art critics and consumers – have come to be seen as defining products of an “American art.” Homer is seen to represent the East Coast, with his crashing waves and stoic Atlantic fisher folk, and Remington the West, with his roughneck ranch hands and romanticized Native American braves. While Homer’s work was slow to catch on at first, he became one of the most respected artists of his day, and he is now universally lauded among the arts intelligentsia as a centrally important figure in the history of American art. Remington, by contrast, enjoyed wide popularity as a young artist, but since his early death his reputation has fallen among the curators, critics and academic art historians who are the keepers of the canon. It is partly for this reason that the two artists’ work has never before been considered together in a major exhibition, despite their surprising number of commonalities. Seeking to redress that oversight – and, to some extent, both artists’ “mythic” status – the Amon Carter Museum of Art, Portland Museum of Art (Maine) and Denver Art Museum have co-organized “Mythmakers: Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington,” on view at the Amon Carter through February 28.

Read the full article here: ANTIQUES AND THE ARTS – Mythmakers: Winslow Homer And Frederic Remington

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

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DAILY ART FIX: Video – Norman Rockwell’s Painting Process

Art world links which caught my eye…

Norman Rockwell created iconic scenes of American life in the 20th century. As a commercial illustrator, he had to work fast, so I forgive his use of a projector to do his drawings from photographs. As this video notes, he originally worked from life, so I have no doubt he was an amazing draftsman on his own. And he could tell such stories in a single image, something I often strive for.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!