DAILY ART FIX: Well-Preserved Tudor Wall Paintings Discovered Beneath Plaster at Medieval Manor

Art world links which caught my eye…

Well-Preserved Tudor Wall Paintings Discovered Beneath Plaster at Medieval Manor

Restorers discovered floor-to-ceiling paintings behind plaster in a bedroom at the Calverley Old Hall in Yorkshire.

During restoration, workers in Yorkshire, England, discovered 16th-century floor to ceiling paintings hidden under 19th-century plaster.

“Never in my own 27 years of working in historic buildings have I ever witnessed a discovery like this,” writes Keay in a blog post. “Hidden paneling, yes, little snatches of decorative painting, once or twice. But an entire painted chamber absolutely lost to memory, a time machine to the age of the Reformation and the Virgin Queen, never.”

Experts are now working to preserve the floor-to-ceiling paintings (essentially Tudor wallpaper), which feature mythical creatures and climbing vines in red, white and black. Painted in the exaggerated grotesque style, the artwork is patterned after designs—inspired by the Golden House of Roman Emperor Nero—that became popular in England during the 16th century.

Read the full article here: SMITHSONIAN – Well-Preserved Tudor Wall Paintings Discovered Beneath Plaster at Medieval Manor

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: FAVORITE PAINTINGS OF ART CRITIC JERRY SALTZ

Art world links which caught my eye…

These days, there are few professionals who matter less than art critics. Jerry Saltz has made a career of it at least, and dispenses opinions on art that range from the insightful to the inane. Saltz’s writings come across like he’s his own biggest fan, but we all have moments of that. In this article, Saltz discusses some of his favorite paintings to look at in New York.  

Florine Stettheimer “The Cathedrals of Fifth Avenue” (1931) Metropolitan Museum of Art

Paint as cake frosting; color as shimmering cellophane. This hallucination of a wedding procession on a red carpet spilling out of a department store raises shopping to a batty rite of passage.

.

Fresco wall painting in a cubiculum (bedroom) from the Villa of P. Fannius Synistor at Boscoreale
ca. 40–30 b.c.; Late Republica, Roman. Metropolitan Museum of Art

Looking at the impeccably proportioned frescos adorning this Pompeian bed chamber puts the lie to the fallacy that perspective was invented in Florence in around 1414. Terraced buildings and intricate courtyards rendered in near perfect perspective produce full-on spatial illusions. The Romans had perspective; they just weren’t that into it.

.

Jasper Johns “Flag” (1954-55) Museum of Modern Art

In 1954 the 26-year old Jasper Johns said, “I dreamed I painted the American Flag.” Then he did! The psychic content of this uncanny, sensuous, cerebral work is the simultaneous inclusiveness. . .  of America but also the ways Johns was an outsider to this openness. The painting, made with encaustic (a medium used by the ancient Egyptians to embalm their dead), is a Betsy Ross moment of modern art; something generations have pledged artistic allegiance to.

See the full list here: ARTNET – A GRAND TOUR by Jerry Saltz

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Masterpiece Story: Claude Monet’s Haystacks

Art world links which caught my eye…

Claude Monet “Meules” 1890

Painters can make the most commonplace items fascinating. Case in point –  Claude Monet, who made haystacks beautiful. This article provides some background and context for Monet’s celebrated series.

The year 1890 was a very important moment in Claude Monet’s life; he turned 50 and bought property for the first time. It was of course his famous house with the garden in Giverny. Meules were inspired by the fields adjacent to his new home.

Read the full article here: DAILY ART MAGAZINE – Masterpiece Story: Claude Monet, Meules

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: List of 10 Finest (Surviving) Examples of Byzantine Art

Art world links which caught my eye…

Mosaic of Christ Pantocrator

“Christ Pantocrator” Hagia Sophia, Istanbul

The Roman Empire travelled east and survived as the Byzantine Empire for 1,000 years. This list depicts the glory of some of their enduring Orthodox artworks.

Byzantine art refers to a distinct artistic style that flourished during the period of the Byzantine Empire (c. 330 – 1453). Its influence, however, survived the fall of the Empire and extended beyond the territories controlled by the Byzantines. Particularly influential in Orthodox countries including Russia, Serbia, Bulgaria and Romania, Byzantine art also left a deep mark on Western Europe, most notably Renaissance Italy.

Read the full article here: ARTLISTS – List of 10 Finest (Surviving) Examples of Byzantine Art

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: William Baziotes, Painter

Art world links which caught my eye…

William Baziotes.jpg

William Baziotes

America painter (June 11, 1912 – June 6, 1963)

“It is the mysterious that I love in painting. It is the stillness and the silence. I want my pictures to take effect very slowly, to obsess and to haunt.” – William Baziotes

William Baziotes “Amorphous Forms”

William Baziotes (US 1912-1963), Night, oil/canvas, 1953. Using delicate  washes of color and imagery culled… | Painting, Philadelphia museum of art,  Art inspiration

William Baziotes “Night”

William Baziotes, The Butterflies of Leonardo da Vinci, 1942 | Weinstein  Gallery

William Baziotes “The Butterflies of Leonardo da Vinci”

William Baziotes “Desert Animal”

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: 7 Films About Art to Cozy Up With This Fall

Art world links which caught my eye…

Watch Philip Guston: A Life Lived | Prime Video

Documentaries, horror, and romances, there are all sorts of art based movies to enjoy this autumn-including one featuring a favorite artist of mine.

The documentary Philip Guston: A Life Lived (1980) began filming in 1971 at Guston’s Woodstock, NY studio and continued through his last retrospective in 1980 at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The artist died that same year. In 2020 a handful of museums including the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. and the Museum of Fine Art, Boston came under fire for postponing a long-planned Guston exhibition due to the controversial nature of his Ku Klux Klan imagery. This film triumphs over censorship and offers the chance to catch up on a recent scandal.

See the full list here: ART & OBJECT – 7 Films About Art to Cozy Up With This Fall

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: New Painting “Ladies Who Lunch”

Completed in November 2021

Richard Bledsoe “Ladies Who Lunch” acrylic on canvas 24″ x 36″

I work from visions I receive. Since my earliest artistic fascinations were linked to dinosaurs, they often appear in my paintings as powerful symbols.

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Suzanne Valadon: The Model Who Became a Master Painter

Art world links which caught my eye…

Suzanne Valadon, “Joy of Life

A model for some great Modern artists turned out to have her own natural artistic talent. A current exhibit in Philadelphia displays the works of Suzanne Valadon (September 23, 1865-April 7, 1938).

“You’re one of us!” In 1894, Edgar Degas, an Impressionist master known for being an incorrigible misogynist, couldn’t help but express his admiration before the drawings that a young brunette, recommended by Toulouse-Lautrec, had brought him at his home in Paris, on Rue Victor-Masseì. In fact, he was the first to buy a piece of work from the artist, whom he nicknamed “the terrible Maria” and praised for possessing the “genius for drawing.”

Born Marie-Cleìmentine Valadon in 1865 in the Limousin region, the young woman was already renowned in the art world of the day, but for quite a different reason. She had made a name as “Maria,” the star model of Renoir (see below) and Puvis de Chavannes. Her expressive beauty, her supple body, and her actress’s agility saw her pose for their paintings as a pink-cheeked dancer, a lady wearing long white gloves, or a stunning bather. She also embodied the contortionist mermaid painted by Austrian artist Gustav Wertheimer and inspired the tired reveler in Toulouse-Lautrec’s The Hangover.

But on the other side of the easel sat a gifted observer, not a mere muse. An innate talent, she had used chalk and pencils to sketch out frozen instants and snapshots of life on scraps of paper or the sidewalk since she was a girl. “She spent huge amounts of time in studios, so she was also watching, listening, learning,” says Nancy Ireson, chief curator of the Barnes Foundation. “And I think perhaps modeling also helps you to understand how pictures are made and what makes a good composition. She was self-taught, but she was exposed to many different artists and clearly had a great visual awareness.”

suzanne-valadon-autoportrait-self-portrait-1927-barnes-foundation

Suzanne Valadon “Self-Portrait” 1927 

Read the full article here: FRANCE-AMERIQUE – Suzanne Valadon: The Model Who Became a Master Painter

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: The Blue Horses of Our Destiny: Artist Franz Marc, the Wisdom of Animals, and the Fight of Beauty Against Brutality

Art world links which caught my eye…

Franz Marc “The Fate of the Animals” 1913 (Right Side Restored by Paul Klee)

Franz Marc was a German artist whose life and promising artistic career were cut short when he was killed in World War I combat. A painter friend paid him a special homage.

Among the paintings he produced in those two ecstatically prolific years just before he was drafted was The Fate of the Animals — an arresting depiction of the interplay of beauty and brutality, terror and tenderness, in the chaos of life. An inscription appeared under the canvas in Marc’s hand: “And all being is flaming agony.”

Destroyed in a warehouse fire in 1916, The Fate of the Animals was restored by Marc’s close friend Paul Klee, who painstakingly recreated the oil canvas from surviving photographs.

Read the full article here: The MarginalianThe Blue Horses of Our Destiny: Artist Franz Marc, the Wisdom of Animals, and the Fight of Beauty Against Brutality

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

THE ART OF DEATH VERSUS THE DEATH OF ART

Damien Hirst Humped The Shark:

The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991)

The arts are undergoing a crisis of relevance. People have been so alienated by the weird dysfunctions of the establishment art world for so long, there is little awareness of what is being advanced as the visual representations of our culture.

This stuff matters more than people know. Art shows us who we are, and it shows us how to be. Right now the arts are dominated by destructive nihilists. Look at what they do, to understand what the elites are trying to program as our way to live.

There is a longstanding artistic tradition of the momento mori: “remember you must die.”

The reality of our own mortality, and coming to terms with it, is a vital function of traditional art. Making something exquisite out of the way of all flesh is a transcendental act. It has been expressed in many ways. Throughout art history, skulls make appearances in paintings, on jewelry, on clocks and watches. Dutch masters painted beautifully naturalistic oil still lifes referred to as vanitas, which included images of bones, snuffed lamps, and hourglasses. They not only celebrated the refined talents of the painters, they implied pending decay.

Pieter Claesz “Vanitas Still Life” (1630) 

The tradition continued over the centuries. In a more recent example, Modernist American painter Georgia O’Keeffe utilized animal skulls and flowers to similar effect. It’s the kind of universal communication that makes art so powerful.

Georgia O’Keeffe “Summer Days” (1936) 

As Christians, we understand our true life is not limited to this earth, but is life eternal granted by the grace of the Son of God. Still, awareness of the briefness of our time here on earth is a powerful motivator. “I am writing this book because we’re all going to die,” mused Beat author Jack Kerouac. He was determined to deliver his story as a supplication to the Lord. Kerouac wanted to make something holy out of all his striving, opening himself to God before the darkness came.

Contemporary art has a different message for us: death as something awkward, gross, and shameful. This is typified by the richest living artist in the world: Damien Hirst.

Choke Artist: Damian Hirst

Hirst has been well rewarded for making death seem supreme. It’s said this hack is worth $1 billion. What put British artist Hirst on the fast track in the first place could be seen as a momento mori of a kind, but with some important caveats.

Hirst was trying to make that connection in his title. Called The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living, the 1991 piece was a fourteen foot long taxidermied tiger shark suspended in a tank of formaldehyde. Since its creation it has changed hands several times, for a price suggested to be as high as $12 million.

Now, Hirst did not catch the shark. He did not stuff the shark. He did not build the tank, or suspend the beast in it. He is a “Conceptual artist.” The idea of Conceptual art is all the artist needs is to have the idea. Others execute it, often by just putting some already existing item like a shark into a new context of a gallery or museum. The artist then acts as a well-networked and “controversial” spokesmodel for their commercialized brand. This business model was most visibly pioneered by Pop artist Andy Warhol, who made some vanitas himself.

Andy Warhol “Skull” (1976)

While Warhol usually sold product placements and celebrity portraits, HIrst’s brand is carcasses. It’s claimed nearly 1 million animals have been processed through his industrial scale artistic abattoir, ranging from butterflies to zebras. He’s advanced from having them merely displayed; they are sliced, diced, contorted and flayed, as per his “vision.” As Hirst has callously stated, he wants to “kill things in order to look at them,” and “Cut us in half, we’re all the fucking same.”

Damien Hirst “Piggy” 

I don’t claim any special virtue for myself. I’m a happy meat eater, and I understand what that means. But what Hirst promotes is far from the traditional momento mori of art. There’s no acknowledgement of the urgency of human experience, the profound significance of life in the face of its certain end. The hands off approach from its originator removes the spiritual resonance of creation in spite of destruction. Hirst implies we are just meat to be manipulated and exploited. It’s an ugly and empty message.

Hirst doesn’t even provide quality in the work he has done in his name. Despite the hype, I’ve seen descriptions of encounters with the shark which say what was once was a magnificent animal looks about as impactful as an overstuffed sofa, lost in the white void of the museum. The original shark rotted away in its tank, and had to be replaced. The contemporary art market is place of such cognitive dissonance there is a hearty debate on whether swapping the shark out meant the artwork was now worthless.

My take? It was worthless in the first place.

Hirst seems to have gotten into the carrion business because he lacks real artistic talent or discernment. After Hirst became a brand name, when he wanted to come up with a mass production way to cash in, he produced the inane spot paintings. I can’t picture a bigger failure in imagination or interest than these generic Twister rip offs. Still, thousands of these have been cranked out by hired help, selling for tens of thousands of dollars each. It’s a way for tasteless but wealthy patrons to partake in Hirst’s rotten prestige in a sterile way, without worrying about formaldehyde leaks.

Damien Hirst

Some People Actually Pay For This: A Hirst Spot Painting

Hirst is still flogging dead horses and more to maintain his top tier art market status. His latest gimmick is ironically putting paint onto a canvas himself, though I wouldn’t go so far as to grace the efforts with the status of paintings.

Spotty Accomplishments: Hirst Cherry Blossoms

Ultimately elites celebrate artists like Hirst because they have a death wish: they wish the rest of us would die, or at least be as passive as corpses while the powerful abuse and pillage our society. The establishment contributes to our destruction by replacing art with icons of physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual deterioration.

A previous version of this article appeared in The Masculinist.

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!