DAILY ART FIX: New Painting “Ladies Who Lunch”

Completed in November 2021

Richard Bledsoe “Ladies Who Lunch” acrylic on canvas 24″ x 36″

I work from visions I receive. Since my earliest artistic fascinations were linked to dinosaurs, they often appear in my paintings as powerful symbols.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

WE LOST A CENTURY OF CULTURE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT ART WORLD’S FAILURES AND MANIPULATIONS. THE NEXT CENTURY CAN BE OURS.

Norman Rockwell “The Connoisseur”

The American attorney and art collector John Quinn (April 14, 1870 – July 28, 1924) had a great insight about the avant-garde works he supported in the early decades of the twentieth century. He described his times as “an age of experiment rather than accomplishment.”

Quinn was describing the rise of Modern art. As early as the late 1700s, it was clear Classical art, reiterations of the ancient achievements of the Greeks, Romans, and Renaissance, did not adequately reflect the temper of the times. But what could? Modern artists bravely tried to find out.

It’s the nature of honest experimentation that failure is more common than success. In science a theory is proposed, tests are conducted, and the results are measured and analyzed, compared to the predicted outcome. But how can novel artistic experiences be rated?

Perhaps there is a fundamental test for art. Ultimately, art is a form of spiritual communication. Does the art deliver a sense of communion, connection, the eternal fellowship of humanity in a recognizable form? That would be successful art.

Much of Modern art’s attempts failed to reach those standards. Yet extreme experiments persisted, even as the appreciation dwindled. Like Spinal Tap, Modern art’s appeal became more selective. For some powerful people, that fulfilled an important non-artistic need: a new means for status signaling.

Cy Twombly, Leda and the Swan

Sold for $52 million in 2017

Any old sap could like skillfully created, beautiful, and meaningful art. Elitists had to flip the script, and make embracing the failed experiments, the ugly and obscure, the new standard of rarified taste. The establishment cultivated a culture war to preserve their isolating Mandarin authority.

We are all the poorer for it. For over a century now institutional support has been funneled into art meant not to unite, but to divide. Museums, galleries, and wealthy patrons warped the course of artistic evolution towards alienation, transgression, and incompetence, all the better to shock the bourgeois they despised. One hundred plus years of inverted snobbery was inflicted upon us. We’ll never know what might have been, what aesthetic glories the land of the free could have produced, without that interference.

This Is What The Gentry Class Fills Our Museums With. Sad!

It’s even worse now, in the Postmodern era. As I scan the art world’s official organs, I see nothing but partisan propaganda, leftist activism misidentified as art. These feeble efforts are deader than Lenin in his glass coffin, but all those who aspire to belong to the ruling caste must shuffle past and pay homage.

One of Postmodern Art Star Banksy’s Half Assed Editorial Cartoons Masquerading as Art

Those who we trusted as the caretakers of our culture betrayed us. We’ve had no support for art that reflects the true character of the United States, our might, goodness, and freedom. But the times are changing, and art can lead the way.

Cultural thought leaders look stupid propping up the absurdity they’ve made into the status quo. They’ve got no creditability left to squander. Their institutions are beyond reform. It’s time to start over. It’s a good place to be, because an American’s natural habitat is the frontier.

Even as Postmodernism undergoes its death throes, a new understanding is rising in the populace. The people are regaining the powers which have been usurped from them. This is the beginning of the Remodern era, and it’s informed by American principles. As I state in my 2018 book, Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is the latest iteration of the American character: ordinary people working as explorers and inventors, optimistic, self-reliant and productive. The Remodernist artist formulates expressions of personal liberty in pursuit of higher meaning and significance. Remodernism is the pursuit of excellence. We don’t grovel before the current cultural gatekeepers, we want to interact with everyone. We are story tellers. We make a complex art for complex times. We are the swing of the pendulum.

The “art as experiment” analogy really isn’t quite satisfactory, because art is not like science, and conflating the two has been disastrous for our society. Elitists defensively over-intellectualized art, which is most effective as a visceral, soulful experience.

Billy Childish, an English artist who first codified Remodernism with painter Charles Thomson in 1999, described a hands-on strategy for the way forward. “The idea is painting, not having ideas about painting…In many ways I sort of like to look on myself as amateur in everything I do. The amateur does things for love, and belief, not for the mortgage.”

That’s the spirit. Look at what “amateur” politician Donald Trump achieved. He put the experts to shame – or rather, he exposed they were lying about their true goals and intentions.

Just like in our politics, no solutions for art’s crisis of relevance will come out of the corrupted hierarchies of the current professional classes. Fortunately, we don’t need anyone’s permission to create a faithful depiction of who we truly are, in art and politics both. Let’s get on with it.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

ARTISTS: Leonard Greco

Leonard Greco “Self Portrait of the Artist as Saint Anthony of the Desert Facing Death” Oil on panel 18″ x 24″ inches 2020

Just as art provides a microcosm of life, the current state of the establishment art world provides a microcosm of the real world. Our cultural institutions have become massively tainted and  dysfunctional. The failures we are enduring were not inevitable or accidental; rather, they are the result of systematic, calculated actions by a corrupt cabal. They’ve betrayed the legitimate functions of the institutions they’ve usurped in favor of their own self-aggrandizing agendas; their rotten practices range from the financial to the spiritual.

But I have great hope for the future, because while the institutions are infiltrated and compromised, the human need for artistic accomplish persists in the people. True art survives outside the ruthlessly filtered cloisters the elitists have cultivated.

My beliefs are confirmed by artists like Leonard Greco. He is pursuing a deeply personal vision, combining native talent with all the skill and craft a lifetime of patient dedication can provide. His imagery is grotesque and surreal, in the tradition of masters like Hieronymus Bosch and Jan Brueghel. While monstrous, the works manage to be beautiful and comical as well.

Greco acknowledges humanity’s conflicts and fallen nature like a medieval morality play or a fairy tale might. There is transcendence in the beauty of his vibrant colors, the complex compositions, and the precise resolution he brings to his paintings and sculptures. He does not shy away from the darkness, but uses art to show the redemption of graceful love. Greco understands how the eternal function of art as an expression and a means for inspiration.

Leonard Greco “Saint George & the Dragon” Oil on panel 16″ x 20″ 2021

Leonard Greco was gracious enough to share some comments on his art and methods in a recent email exchange.

QUESTION: How did you initially get involved in the visual arts? Who were some of your inspirations?

Leonard Greco: There hasn’t been a period of my life where art-making wasn’t a significant element of my identity. Early on I picked up pencil and brush. I was fortunate in having an eccentric grandmother who was very creative, a gifted amateur in all manner of artistic expression: oil painting, stained glass, fine jewelry making, silversmithing, set design.

We saw one another infrequently, but I treasure the memories of time spent in her thrilling company, she was certainly a great, if erratic, inspiration. 

Q: How do you create your paintings?  

 LG: I’m primarily a painter in oil. I am also an avid draughtsman, my painting start first in copious pencil studies ( I try to draw daily). I then, once I have a mental roadmap, begin the painting process. This process is laborious, in part because I am self taught and very well may be reinventing the wheel but also because the paintings I most admire, namely northern medieval and Renaissance panel paintings, possess a fastidious lapidary finish. Wishing to emulate that effect takes a great deal of time. I work with absurdly small brushes and there are far too many studio days when the territory claimed is mere inches of the canvas. 

In addition to easel painting I also create textile art, frequently near life sized fiber constructions that I call “stuffed paintings”; they are hybrid works, part sculpture, part painting.


Leonard Greco “Robin Goodfellow” Mixed textile Life size 2019


Q: What do you hope to convey through your work? 

LG: I wish to create a mythic timeless space that in spite of its  unreality resonates as familiar. I am inspired by my dreams which are rich, highly symbolic and frequently terrifying. They possess a dim grey light , frequently shadowless, I try to capture that haunting atmosphere. 

I am also trying to convey the universal truths we humans share, truths concerning life, death, one’s soul, worldliness in all its fraught excesses  and the pursuit of the true, highly individual light given to us by our Maker. This search I think is best sought through myth and story telling. I am essentially a myth maker, a Fairy-taler.

Leonard Greco “The Knight’s Tale (after Chaucer)” Acrylic on canvas panel 18″ x 24″ 2020



Q: What have been some of the highlights of your artistic journey and career?


LG: Very early on I had unearned solo shows, I was far too young, far too undeveloped and frankly just naive, smug and stupid. Since those halcyon youthful days there has been time spent in the desert of isolation and inwardness. I had the good fortune to have a solo show called Leonard Greco’s Fairyland in 2019 (  https://leonardgreco.me/fairyland/ ) one more deserved, more intentional and most gratifying. Since that time I’ve acquired more collectors, have been included in more exhibitions ( including permanent collections) and looking forward to further collaborations and opportunities. But it’s been an arduous and discouraging journey, to be an artist requires  courage, tenacity, grueling, frequently unrewarded labor and limitless faith.
 

Q: Are you optimistic about the direction the arts are going in? Why? 


LG: I am not. Pessimism is so easy to succumb to and every century has had its doomsayers yet I am hard pressed not to feel a sense of despair when confronting a society of art elites hellbent on disregarding the history, beauty, craft and spirituality of our shared Western tradition. Without indulging in a screed against identity obsessed post modernism, what I encounter routinely in public museums and private galleries leaves me disheartened, cynical, uninspired and bluntly, quite bored. I never imagined being bored by contemporary art.
 

Q: Why does art matter in the 21st century? 

LG: For starters I hope for a 22nd century, one that can look back to the 21st and reflect upon how fascinating and creative we were. Century after century, man has spoken to the next age. Through literature , art , music we send forth our best, for ourselves, for our Maker, for our contemporaries and in some way for our future kin. The art making of our day frequently reflects narcissistically upon a cynical,  ironic age, one not given to a pursuit broader than pleasure and paper thin superficiality and when it does venture beyond its own navel, focuses not on eternal truths but instead is devoted to an identity politics of grudges, chip-on-the-shoulder score settling, a highly honed aesthetic of anger and retribution. It rarely creates engaging, inspiring or enlightening art. I require art that nourishes, nurtures and inspires my fullest aspirations, all too often when I am confronted with contemporary work deemed  “meaningful” or “ powerful” by the art elites, I am instead left with a sense of extreme impoverishment.

Q: Why does art matter to you?

LG: It saved me, it offered hope and a sense of purpose. That’s so overblown and absurdly dramatic but it’s true. My boyhood was one of poverty, materially and spiritually. There was great violence in my home as well, little peace and no beauty other than the natural God given sort. Yet somehow, miraculously, in our attic there were discarded family treasures: old Bibles, Victorian scrapbooks and most tantalizingly, art history books belonging to my above mentioned Nana. Thumbing through these books, possessing what now would be considered the most minimal of images, I was nonetheless transported to the world of the ancient Egyptians, the vase paintings of the Greeks, the Medici court. It was a revelation, I wanted desperately to draw like Durer, I recall specifically taking pencil to tablet and with Durer’s patch of turf in mind, meticulously recording a dandelion. 

My life was so desolate in my youth, deep, seemingly unbearable depressions, despair and shame  in being a misunderstood gay kid , suicidal fantasies and yet through it all I drew. This determined practice allowed me to see myself as an artist despite the odds; the odds are still there yet I still cling to hope for what else is there?

Visit Leonard Greco on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leonardgrecoart/

Leonard Greco “The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus” Oil on canvas 48″ x 36″ 2019

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: “Talent Is Vastly Overrated” Billy Childish’s Anti-Guide to Succeeding in the Art World

Art world links which caught my eye…

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Billy Childish “Self Portrait in Hat” 2015

In 1999 English artists Charles Thomson and Billy Childish cofounded Stuckism, the first Remodern art movement. Thomson remained engaged and guided Stuckism into a global phenomenon.  Childish left the group to follow his own idiosyncratic course.

In this 2015 interview, Childish shares his philosophy on creativity and life.

I don’t look for validation from other people. In music, I never thought that we weren’t as good as anybody else. I thought we were better than anybody else. When we were in the Pop Rivets and we made our records, people asked us if we wanted to be successful. Even as 18-year-old kids, we said, “As far as we’re concerned, we are successful. We’re doing what we want to do.” I’m probably a bit like that it painting as well. I’m innately confident, even in inability.

The thing I like about painting, you see, is painting. I’m not interested in the aftermath so much. I just happen to be someone with an artistic nature, so I like doing art. That’s something that plays out, but it doesn’t define me. The paintings rely on me—I don’t rely on the paintings. They’re just stuff. They do have some value to some people, but, really, anything that’s any good will hopefully lead you to you, not to the object. We’re looking for ourselves, not to own the Mona Lisa…

You have to have the guts to engage with your own spiritual journey, which is what life is for. It can be reflected in art, but art won’t take you there on its own. It’s not good enough. You actually have to use your inquiring mind and question yourself and the bullshit of things. You have to avoid getting tied up in intellectual and ironic gameplay, which will not liberate you. We want freedom, we want liberation, and you’re not going to get it in postmodernism. You’re going to get it through authentic engagement.

Read the full article here: ARTSPACE – “Talent Is Vastly Overrated” Billy Childish’s Anti-Guide to Succeeding in the Art World

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

Social Climate Change is the One to Focus On

Richard Bledsoe “The Conspirators” acrylic on canvas 24″ x 24″

I originally posted the painting above to this blog on March 31, 2019. This is what I had to say about it at the time:

My latest completed painting. These sinister characters lurk in the shadows and plot. It is them, and those of their ilk, which have woven the web of delusions that are driving our culture to ruin.

I spend a lot of time on the internet studying current events and bizarre phenomenon. I see something truly massive taking form that will change the dynamic of the entire world. I call these changes the dawn of the Remodern Age. I describe them in detail in my book, Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization.

Am I crazy, or ahead of the curve? Time will tell. In the meantime, here are another couple of sinister characters.

Richard and Michele Read the News

A year later, on March 31, 2020, we had just been informed two weeks to flatten the curve was just not good enough. Really. Flatten the curve, or flatten our civilization?

I am convinced the painting I made was a premonition of the Overblown Outbreak. What I did not take into account in the prediction made in my statement is before we reach the Remodern era, we have to survive the death throes of Postmodernism. We’re living that now, and it’s ugly.

The state of the culture is like that quote about the weather attributed to Mark Twain: everybody’s talking about it, but no one does anything about it.

Granted, there’s lots to complain about. Any sensible observer can see the social environment is rotting before our eyes. There’s endless commentary available on the latest outrages, and the hits just keep on coming.

It is important to call out the issues occurring. The first step towards change is recognizing there is a problem. But it’s only the first step. Once the problem is identified, it’s not effective to just keep recognizing it, over and over again. Action is called for.

Unlike the phony climate change hoax, the social environment is manmade. The cultural decay we are experiencing is the result of deliberate behaviors by specific people. They have intentions, and they make decisions. Funds are spent or withheld; access is granted or denied; viewpoints are encouraged or suppressed. The originating perpetrators tend to move stealthily, shielded by bureaucratic haze and patient incrementalism. Accountability is so defused, it is non-existent.  This is by design.

Much of the proclaimed Postmodern mindset is based on severing the rational connection between cause and effect. Popular Postmodern positions require accepting delusions like being born a particular sex does not determine what “gender” you are. Or that community crime is caused by too much of a police presence. Or that the most free, prosperous and diverse nation in human history is the most racist and oppressive.

The Postmodern philosophy tends to be a package deal; if you believe any of this junk, odds are you believe all of it. Easily verifiable evidence refutes these assertions, and scores of other crazy notions like them. And yet the evidence is not heard; it’s not even allowed to be presented. This is not an accident, not just chance or misfortune. It’s a carefully managed plan.

We don’t know the names of those who are ultimately driving these schemes. That’s part of the plan as well. What I can see informs me that these persons unknown are very aware of the reality of causation, and the destructive results of the ideas they promote. This isn’t a situation of unintended consequences.  The influencers aren’t deluded; they are manipulative liars, living embodiments of Doublethink double standards. They are superspreaders of delusion. They’ve weaponized it to advance their agenda.

Sadly, through covert campaigns, our cultural institutions are inundated by those working towards the death of our culture. Whether the participants are fellow travelers or just useful idiots, the end results will be the same.

Now, enough with the recognizing of the problem, again. Once recognition happens, it’s time to take responsibility.

What are we to do? I have great hope here. This human caused social environment crisis can be countered by other humans. Knowing most of our existing hierarchies are hopelessly compromised at the moment, independent action is called for. Let us be a joyous insurgency, each in our own way.

I have a soft target, in the arts. Establishment art has degenerated into an alienating money laundering racket. The audience for contemporary art is practically nil. Yet the creation and contemplation of art is an instinctual appetite for humanity. We still need it, want it, crave it even.

All you people who ever visited an art gallery or museum and left baffled or upset, I’m speaking to you. You were never the problem. So much of what our compromised cultural institutions present as art isn’t really art at all. It is propaganda meant to prop up the delusion. You knew they were failing to meet the genuine need for art you had.

I make art that comes to me in visions. Like dreams, the visions are full mysterious significance, and affirm the beauty and weirdness of the life God has granted us. My works will not be to all tastes, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Just know my paintings are the result of a sincere effort to share my particular nature in an attempt to reach universal connection.

Trust your own instincts, and find the art that appeals to you-or even better, try to make it yourself. It’s a rewarding experience, with endless capacity for growth.

Taking free actions, rejecting approved parameters of the officially sanctioned narrative, is how we can make actual climate change happen. It’s the Remodern way.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Video – At The Crossroad

A repost from June 28, 2015

 

“At the Crossroad” acrylic on canvas 24″ x 30″ by Richard Bledsoe

This painting was inspired by blues legend Robert Johnson. It was claimed Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil in exchange for musical talent. In this video, I talk about why that is a bad idea.

At the Crossroad sold the first time I exhibited it, purchased by a nice young couple. I have no idea who they were, or where the painting is today.

I enjoy when someone connects with my paintings.

Art enriches life.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

DAILY ART FIX: Video – The Future of Art According to Billy Childish

Art world links which caught my eye…

Billy Childish and Charles Thomson codified the ideas of Remodernism, the art movement which will replace corrupt Postmodernism. Here Billy Childish talks about where art is going.

“The art world is the same as the rest of the world,” says British artist, writer, and punk-rocker Billy Childish. “What it requires is new, more, and now.” Childish has worked defiantly and prolifically outside of the mainstream since his expulsion from art school in the early 1980s. To the polymath—whose paintings, poems, novels, and music draw heavily from his autobiography—art is a deeply personal experience that should not rely on external validation, whether from critics or audiences.

From his painting studio located on a historic dockyard in Kent, United Kingdom, Childish speaks passionately about the freedom that comes with self-validation. When asked about his perspective on the future of art, he demurs. “People think we’re continually ascending a mountain to success or to enlightenment,” he says. “It’s here and now and this is it.”

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

An Elitist Professor Evangelizes On How the Dysfunctional Art World Functions

Straight From the Horse’s Ass

Professor Magnus Resch Lectures the Little People

Like the latest ongoing Hunter Biden pay for play art scheme exposes, the establishment art market is a corrupt scam. At its core, there are probably not more than a few thousand globalists involved in this shady business, which was estimated to have reached over $64 billion in sales as of 2019. As the great critic Robert Hughes once observed, “Apart from drugs, art is the biggest unregulated market in the world.”

By the way, regulation isn’t a solution here. It would only add more layers of graft.

At least drug lords actually have to deliver the goods to receive their ill-gotten profits. The art world is racing into making intangible nothings like NFTs or invisible sculptures just as valuable as the exquisite examples of human skill and insight which used to earn the designation of masterpieces. The white collar criminals involved only care about enabling money laundering, tax evasion, and insider trading. Actual artwork is becoming an unneeded middle man, revealed as just a flimsy excuse for whatever illicit financial transactions they need to disguise.

A faction of this cartel is after more than just money. They are Marxists bent on world domination. Undermining the culture in order to undermine the people is their primary goal, so they invest their money in the most ridiculous anti-art available. Because of the status and clout of this cabal, they have warped the market into a travesty, substituting propaganda, irrelevance, carrion, excrement, pornography, and debris for art.

This puts contemporary artists in a terrible situation. The manipulators of the market demand conformity with their debased agenda if an artist is to have any chance of advancement. Yet the disgusting non-art pushed by the compromised cultural institutions have ruined art’s reputation with the general public. How can an artist who actually wants to make quality art get anywhere?

Under the corrupt status quo, they can’t. Now someone who is part of the problem, a member of the New Aristocracy of the Well Connected, is stepping up to explain how artists and audiences need to knuckle under to the unprincipled New Normal.

Like many elitists, it looks like art economist Magnus Resch likes to play the credentials game. His resume includes business studies at Harvard and the London School of Economics, and teaching at Columbia and Yale. The real world results of Ivy League alumni shows those entities are ground zero for the much of the rot our culture is undergoing, but because the establishment is a closed system, the privileged expect to be shielded from the consequences of the destruction they cause.

Resch has a new book to hawk, How to Become a Successful Artist. On the one hand, it seems he is presenting  a fair assessment of the dire reality of art as a business. But on the other hand, he is hyping divisive Cultural Marxist virtue signaling filtered through Big Tech as the way forward. In Cultured magazine, Resch states:

“My vision is an art world that is transparent, fair and equal and embraces new technologies. Exhibitions are curated via swarm intelligence, not through the selection of a few so-called experts with an art history degree. A more diverse group of artists will finally get museum recognition, supported by a healthy gallery system that is adjusted to the number of buyers. This will attract a new generation of art buyers whose focus is on purpose, rather than profit. They understand that buying art is not just the purchase of an artwork but a philanthropic investment. The questions responsible art buyers will ask are not, ‘How much can I sell it for in 5 years?’ but, ‘How will my purchase support a community and align with my values?’”

From his ivory tower, Resch is elitist-splaining to us how we should not expect quality art which has long term worth. Instead, we should make affirmative action selections in art which will allow us to preen about how we are supporting some preference group. Whoever gets to program his “swarm intelligence” will doubtlessly control what the favored outcomes are. The promoted will be selected due to ideology, skin color, sexual preference, etc – nothing to do with artistic accomplishment. This attitude of bringing non-artistic concerns and lowered expectations into the art world will just continue the disastrous irrelevance of art.

I am curious to read Resch’s book. Not because I expect it will actually educate me how to be a “successful” artist, but because it will give me more insight into the unscrupulous system. The current art world configuration needs to be destroyed for humanity’s sake. Based on Resch’s misdiagnosis for the solutions, it should be even easier to break the monopolistic fraud by presenting real art to the people, and bypassing the establishment’s alienating assumptions and attitudes.

As I described in my 2018 book, Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Art is a more enduring and vital human experience than the power games of a greedy and fraudulent ruling class. The managers crashed the culture in pursuit of their agenda. They defend their usurped authority and privileges with doublethink, misdirection, and intimidation. Their time has run out.

Reality is crashing back through their carefully constructed facades, and a time of reckoning has come. Enduring changes start in the arts. Remodernism defeats Postmodern desecration.

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I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

Exposing the Art World’s Critical Race Theory Problem

It seems like it’s in the news every day now. An establishment ploy to divide and distract Americans is finally getting the attention and pushback it deserves in some of the fields where it is occurring.

However, there is a vital area where this toxic plot is still going unchallenged.

The destructive ideology of Critical Race Theory (CRT) has operated like a stealth bomber up until recently. No one realized it was there, until it started dropping its payload of hatred, bitterness, and manipulation on unsuspecting targets across society.

CRT is a top-down effort to persuade us into accepting the cognitive dissonance that behaving like bigots is the solution to bigotry. Of course, what the New Aristocracy of the Well Connected really wants to do isn’t what they claim they are doing. The establishment doesn’t want solutions. They deliberately invent problems where there are none, and make existing problems worse. The point of bigotry is bigotry, as Orwell might have informed us; an officially cultivated and sanctioned policy of intolerance against those who don’t conform. Ultimately, the elites don’t care whether the people are persuaded or not, as long as we obey.

The establishment has played a long game, slowly imposing a totalitarian state on a free people. The two electoral victories of President Donald Trump (one of them currently stolen) shocked globalists into accelerating their timeline. To accomplish the undermining of America’s strength, our would-be ruling class needs their divide-and-conquer propaganda to become the only recognized model of our society. They distribute CRT indoctrination through the institutions they control: academia, the media, Big Tech, and corporate boardrooms. It’s one big PsyOp directed at the American populace.

But the elitist urgency to force race hatred onto goodhearted and proud American citizens has backfired. Even the censorship imposed here in life behind the Silicon Curtain can’t stop the information from spreading. Patriots are confronting schoolboards, shutting off the fake news, and boycotting woke businesses. This is just the beginning.

But an important aspect of our culture is still suffering from unchecked CRT distortions: the arts. Establishment art has been in a crisis of relevance for decades now, so it’s not surprising most people are oblivious to these latest examples of extremist rot. The cultural consequences of this unacknowledged festering could be immense. 

I didn’t have to look far to find examples. Just about every art site I visit in my ongoing research is riddled with leftist ideology. As the art world is a place dominated by virtue signaling and trend following, CRT is hot right now. I could go on and on with all the artists, museums, schools, and foundations hyping CRT. These samples of CRT proselyting come from three of the major art publications operating today.

Each article comes with a preposterous (and self-serving) assertion treated as if it were a factual statement. Simultaneously, there is a contemptuous and condescending attitude towards the abilities of those they claim to be advocating for. It’s what Thomas Sowell describes as the “soft bigotry of low expectations.”

ARTnews: As Atlanta’s Art Scene Evolves, Historic Injustices and Hopes for New Futures Come into Focus

But for all its giving over the years, the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta had a problem with who was getting that funding—until [social justice activist Heather] Infantry took up the cause. After finding that 87 percent of foundation funds had historically gone to white-led organizations, Infantry went public with the news while pointing out that certain rules for eligibility (related to budget and staff size, for example) effectively shut out many small and struggling arts organizations that needed support the most. “When you get down to it, the Community Foundation is an incredibly racist institution when it creates guidelines and criteria that disqualify Black arts organizations that are so prolific and abundant,” said Infantry, whose advocacy efforts helped change things for the better. [emphasis mine]

Assertion: Objective, consistent performance standards are racist! Implied: minorities are poor and disorganized.

Art In America: How Dionne Lee Combines Darkroom Techniques with Wilderness Survival Tactics

Lee began interrogating the racialized histories of the American landscape by means of photography in 2016, while an MFA student at the California College of the Arts… The works bespeak Lee’s interest in exploring the body’s relationship to the land, and in tools that facilitate survival in the wilderness, an ability relevant to both social history and climate change. Motivated by fear of impending ecological disaster, Lee has been learning a number of outdoor skills: how to navigate, make fires, and forage for food. During a lecture at the Rhode Island School of Design last fall, Lee noted, “My ancestors, who were enslaved, had to be survivalists, and I’m attempting to reclaim that heritage.” In response to nearly drowning in a public pool as a child, she made her gelatin silver print A place to drown (2019) by scanning an image of a desolate swimming hole. Lee slowly dragged a found photograph across a digital flatbed, and the resulting image is a distorted view of what seems like a gaping hole, perhaps a portal for escape. Swimming is yet another survival skill that reflects histories of racial oppression. The work brings up questions of access: historically, who had the right to swim? Who had access to water? Who had the privilege to perfect the survival skill of swimming? [emphasis mine]

Assertion: Swimming is racist! Implied: This teacher from Stanford University, who is taking part in an exhibit sponsored by the New York Museum of Modern Art, is marginalized and oppressed. Bonus climate change alarmism in this one! I’m sure college art activist is a fine set of skills to bring to the pending weather apocalypse she anticipates.

ARTFORUM: School Spirit – Jessica Lynne on art and Historically Black Colleges and Universities [HBCUs]

In an era framed by the political fervor of the Movement for Black Lives, “mainstream” (read: white) museums, galleries, cinemas, and other cultural organizations are frantic to reckon with the oppressions that have structured their existences, hiring more Black leadership and curatorial staff, increasing acquisitions of work by Black artists and other artists of color, and investing in infrastructure that supports the education of Black students and scholars. [emphasis mine] But if you were to ask your average art-world denizen to discuss the position of HBCUs in relation to these ongoing structural negotiations, you would most likely be met with blank stares.

Assertion: Scrambling to accommodate affirmative action is racist! (Well, it actually is, but not in the way the author of the article thinks). Implied: Minorities can’t be accomplished artists and scholars in their own right, so they need to be promoted on the basis of skin color.

The CRT sickness is spread by a combination of would-be authoritarians, useful idiots, and fearful followers. It’s an emotional, and ultimately a spiritual, disease.

Critical Race Theory is a product of Postmodernism, the corrupt operating system of elitists around the world. Postmodernism is a clumsy Cultural Marxist power grab disguised with sophistry and misdirection.

In 1999, two English artists, Charles Thomson and Billy Childish, first codified Remodernism, a cultural shift destined to displace the failed tyranny of Postmodernism. They wrote, ” Why do we need a new spirituality in art? Because connecting in a meaningful way is what makes people happy. Being understood and understanding each other makes life enjoyable and worth living.”

CRT is not about this kind of connection; it aims to shame and dominate.

At the time of Remodernism’s founding, Thomson and Childish used the absurdity and excesses of the Conceptual art movement to define their opposition. But even those seemingly silly offerings were political; harbingers of cultural suicide camouflaged as kitschy sculptures, rotting animals, and dirty beds in museums.

When Art Was Just Stupid: Jeff Koons “Michael Jackson and Bubbles”

Now the pretense is gone, and we see art being openly used as a weapon for bullying.

CRT is a set of lies about the essence of the United States, claiming the greatest nation in history was founded by racism in order to enable even more racism. The CRT assault is aimed directly at all those who took the inspiring words of Dr. Martin Luther King to heart: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

CRT betrays Dr. King’s dream, his example, his legacy, and indeed the premise of America, as stated in our national motto: E Pluribus Unum, “Out of many, One.”

We can say this because American is not a race, or an ethnicity, or a class. American is a set of principles, and appreciation for the opportunities those principles provide. That’s why the United States was called a melting pot for so long: despite all of our varied origins and circumstances, America gives a fresh start. We were forming a new civilization together, making many into that new dynamic Unum, the likes of which the world had never seen.

The world didn’t like this.

They attacked us by inserting a kind of disease into what should be the United States. Critical Race Theory is a virus, an infection unleashed by an anti-American globalist cabal to weaken our nation.

There’s a lot of that going around lately.

It’s sad to see CRT being utilized anywhere, but it’s especially galling to see it applied to the arts. Art is one of the things that brings us together, throughout all times, and all cultures. The art world can be as big as all of humankind, if we do it right. That is why it’s worth speaking out against these cynical attempts to use art as a wedge. We can defeat this impulse by making art great again, and using it as an expression of the unity and brotherhood of our better natures. It’s the American way, after all.

Critical Race Theory is incompatible with art, and by extension, with civilization.

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RICHARD BLEDSOE is a visual story teller; a painter of fables and parables. He received his BFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University. Richard has been an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, in both the United States and internationally. He lives and paints happily in Phoenix, Arizona, with his wife Michele and cat Motorhead. He is the author of Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is not a style of art, it is a form of motivation. We express the universal language of inspired humanity.

We do not imitate what came before. We find in ourselves the same divine essence of love and excitement which has inspired masterpieces throughout history. We are strengthened by drawing on traditions thousands of years old.

We integrate the bold, visionary efforts of the Modern era into a holistic, meaningful expression of contemporary life. Remodernism seeks a humble maturity which heals the fragmentation and contradictions of Modernism, and obliterates the narcissistic lies of Postmodernism.

Remodernism is the return of art as a revelation.

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!

Artist Quotes About America

Reposted from July 3, 2017 

Thornton Dial “Don’t Matter How Raggly The Flag, It Still Got To Tie Us Together”

“If we going to change the world, we got to look at the little man.”

Thornton Dial

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Happy Independence Day!

In large part, the creative classes are saturated in globalist propaganda. The institutional indoctrination is very thorough, and of course most funding opportunities rely on conforming to the elitist gentry agenda.  Sad!

However, there are examples of artists who spoke their minds about the fantastic nature of the American experience. In the United States our culture is currently experiencing the death throes of manipulative, oppressive Postmodernism. As we enter the new era of Remodernism, the return of art as a revelation, expect to see more artists express the ethos of liberty in deeds, words and pictures.

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Andy Warhol “Van Heusen (Ronald Reagan)”

“I met someone on the street who said wasn’t it great that we’re going to have a movie star for president, that it was so Pop, and when you think about it like that, it is great, it’s so American.”

-Andy Warhol

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Thomas Eakins “The Champion Single Sculls”

“Of course, it is well to go abroad and see the works of the old masters, but Americans… must strike out for themselves, and only by doing this will we create a great and distinctly American art.”

-Thomas Eakins

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Arthur Dove “Me and the Moon”

“What constitutes American painting?… things may be in America, but it’s what is in the artist that counts. What do we call ‘American’ outside of painting? Inventiveness, restlessness, speed, change..”

-Arthur Dove

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Jacob Lawrence “The Migration Series Panel 58”


“Maybe…humanity to you has been reduced to the sterility of the line, the cube, the circle, and the square; devoid of all feeling, cold and highly esoteric. If this is so, I can well understand why you cannot portray the true America. It is because you have lost all feeling for man.”

-Jacob Lawrence

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Willem De Kooning “Dark Pond”

“I feel sometimes an American artist must feel, like a baseball player or something – a member of a team writing American history.”

-Willem De Kooning

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Georgia O’Keeffe “Cow Skull: Red, White and Blue”

“One can not be an American by going about saying that one is an American. It is necessary to feel America, like America, love America and then work.”

-Georgia O’Keeffe

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Jack Kerouac “Untitled”

“I felt like a million dollars; I was adventuring in the crazy American night.”

-Jack Kerouac

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Grant Wood “Stone City, Iowa”

“I had to go to France to appreciate Iowa.”

-Grant Wood

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Richard Bledsoe “The Pop Star”

Remodernism is the latest iteration of the American character: ordinary people working as explorers and inventors, optimistic, self-reliant and productive.”

-Richard Bledsoe

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RICHARD BLEDSOE is a visual story teller; a painter of fables and parables. He received his BFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University. Richard has been an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, in both the United States and internationally. He lives and paints happily in Phoenix, Arizona, with his wife Michele and cat Motorhead. He is the author of Remodern America: How the Renewal of the Arts Will Change the Course of Western Civilization:

Remodernism is not a style of art, it is a form of motivation. We express the universal language of inspired humanity.

We do not imitate what came before. We find in ourselves the same divine essence of love and excitement which has inspired masterpieces throughout history. We are strengthened by drawing on traditions thousands of years old.

We integrate the bold, visionary efforts of the Modern era into a holistic, meaningful expression of contemporary life. Remodernism seeks a humble maturity which heals the fragmentation and contradictions of Modernism, and obliterates the narcissistic lies of Postmodernism.

Remodernism is the return of art as a revelation.

**************

I don’t fundraise off of my blog. I don’t ask for Patreon or Paypal donations. If you’d like to support the Remodern mission, buy a book. Or a painting

Learn more About My Art: Visionary Experience

My wife Michele Bledsoe has written her own inspirational book, Painting, Passion and the Art of Life.

Remodernism Video: BEFORE THERE WAS FAKE NEWS, THERE WAS FAKE ART

Visit other posts for more commentary on the state of the arts.

Please send any inquiries to info@remodernamerica.com. Thank you!